Looking for a Facebook Ads Agency?

We’re a team of twenty-three web, digital marketing, SEO, and operations professionals. Heaviside Group was founded in 2011 as a side project and has continued to grow and expand year after year.

Our group is divided into four internal teams: Web, Digital Marketing, SEO, and Operations. Each team has specialists in those disciplines, and they work together to deliver projects accurately and on-time. Everything is managed by our operations team, which provides sales, customer service, and project management support to our clients.

In 2017, we launched our Heaviside Digital platform, designed to provide high-quality web, digital marketing, and SEO services to businesses with lower marketing budgets.

SERVICES

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Facebook Ads – Consultation
$125.00
Up to one-hour phone consultation, with screen share if needed. Troubleshoot, audit, review, etc. Audit may reduce live call time.
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Facebook Ads – Basic
4.9
(75)
$300.00 / month
We will build your Facebook Ads campaign and manage spend up to $500 per month.
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Facebook Ads – Standard
4.8
(76)
$450.00 / month
We will build your Facebook Ads campaign and manage spend up to $1,000 per month.
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Facebook Ads – Premium
4.9
(75)
$795.00 / month
We will build your Facebook Ads campaign and manage spend up to $4,000 per month.
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REVIEWS

jeffersonlew232
jeffersonlew232
5/5

You did an amazing job

2 years ago
driftersldn
driftersldn
5/5

Really diligent and patient, thank you so much!

2 years ago
socialdesigners
socialdesigners
5/5

Another month with heavisidegroup and I'm very happy with their work!

2 years ago
jacksum
jacksum
5/5

They did manage the ad campaign on fb as promised .... although we didn’t see any sales they did do their part in running the ads and managing them as promised .

2 years ago
milcaguadalupe
milcaguadalupe
5/5

It was a very good experience. I appreciate their patience and hard work.

2 years ago

About Service

A Facebook Ads Agency basically handles Facebook marketing campaigns for the clients. These days, there has never been a greater time to begin a new business online than right now. One of today's most popular lifestyle companies you could develop from nothing is a Facebook marketing agency. With the huge number of potential customers on Facebook, it's vital to constantly drive qualified traffic to one's business website. A Facebook campaign can also be used to generate lead generation which can be extremely profitable.

When it comes to creating Facebook ads campaigns, it's important to stay as generic as possible. Don't give away too much information about your company's specific product or service up front. Targeting specific demographics is ideal and by targeting specific markets you'll easily be able to increase your customer base. A Facebook ads agency has the expertise to create ad campaigns that are completely tailored to each and every client. They know how to effectively target demographics and create an ad campaign that will deliver results.

Targeting specific markets is essential because this way you'll be more likely to retain those customers. Remember, a person who isn't interested in your product is likely not going to click on your ad. However, they could still be on your mailing list. Using the data from your Facebook ads clients, the ad marketers will create ads that will target the people who want what you have to offer, and you'll increase your sales!

It's not hard to generate leads with a Facebook ads agency either. By targeting your ads based on keywords, location, gender, age or any other form of demographic you'll quickly get clients clicking through to your website. It's that simple and effective. So you don't need to spend hours posting messages on social media sites when you could be generating leads on autopilot with a great advertising agency and web marketing tool.

Don't believe that the sky is the limit with advertising online. There are so many businesses trying to market online that it can be difficult to find quality leads that actually want to buy something. But you won't have to spend all day posting messages on social networking sites trying to drum up business as you can let a professional advertising agency to do that for you. The real money is in quality campaigns that target people who are actually looking for what you have to offer. It's much easier to sell to the masses than it is to sell to a group of individuals who are already halfway vested.

Once you've got quality leads, your next step is to convert them into sales. That's where retargeting ad campaigns come in. These campaigns allow you to target people already interested in what you have to offer but who are not ready to make a purchase just yet. With retargeting campaigns you simply need to send them a message asking them if they are ready to take that next step and give you their name, email, phone number, and the URL where they can find more information about your products and services. You can then follow up with a second message asking them if they still want to take the action you requested of them. By doing this you're increasing your chances of converting those leads into actual sales, which will increase your chances of making more money from Facebook ads.

ABOUT Parma

In 1806, the area that would eventually become Parma and Parma Heights was originally surveyed by Abraham Tappan, a surveyor for the Connecticut Land Company, and was known as Township 6 - Range 13. This designation gave the town its first identity in the Western Reserve. Soon after, Township 6 - Range 13 was commonly referred to as "Greenbriar," supposedly for the rambling bush that grew there. Benajah Fay, his wife Ruth Wilcox Fay, and their ten children, arrivals from Lewis County, New York, were the first settlers in 1816. It was then that Greenbriar, under a newly organized government seat under Brooklyn Township, began attending to its own governmental needs.

Self-government started to gain in popularity by the time the new Greenbriar settlement contained twenty householders. However, prior to the establishment of the new township, the name Greenbriar was replaced by the name Parma. This was largely due to Dr. David Long who had recently returned from Italy and "impressed with the grandeur and beauty...was reminded of Parma, Italy and...persuaded the early townspeople that the territory deserved a better name than Greenbriar."

Thus, on March 7, 1826, a resolution was passed ordering the construction of the new township. It stated,

On the same day, a public notice was issued to qualified electors by the County Commissioners. They met at the house of Samuel Freeman on April 3, 1826 to elect township officers according to the law. It was then that the first eleven officers were elected to lead the new government.

During this time, Parma Township remained largely agricultural. The first schoolhouse was a log structure built on the hill at the northern corner of what is now Parma Heights Cemetery. A memorial plate on a stone marks the spot. In 1827, the township was divided into road districts. The Broadview Road of today was then known as Town Line Road as well as Independence Road. Ridge Road was known then as Center Road as it cut through the center of town. York Road was then known as York Street as arrivals from the state of New York settled there. Pearl Road then had many names which included Medina Wooster Pike, Wooster Pike, the Cleveland Columbus Road, and the Brighton and Parma Plank Road.

A stone house, built in 1849 and known as the Henninger House, was occupied by several generations of Henningers and is still standing today. The house rests on one of the higher points in Cuyahoga County, which provided visibility for the entire northeastern part of Parma Township. This was also the same site where the Erie Indians, centuries before, stood to read and send fire signals as well as pray to their spirits.

By 1850, the US census listed Parma Township's population at 1,329. However, the rising population of the township had slowed over the decades. The Civil War affected Parma much as it did other towns and villages in the nation. Three out of four homes sent a father, sons, or sometimes both, to fight in the war. By 1910, the population of the township had increased to 1,631.

In 1911, Parma Heights, due to the temperance mood of the day, separated itself from the Parma Township after by a vote of 42 to 32 and was incorporated as a village comprising 4.13 square miles.

By 1920, the US census showed Parma Township had a population of just 2,345, but the following decade proved to be a time of significant growth and development for Parma. It was in the 1920s that Parma Township transformed from a farming community into a village. On December 15, 1924, Parma was incorporated as a village.

The largest and fastest growing development of that time was H. A. Stahl's Ridgewood Gardens development, which started in 1919, continued through the 1920s, and into the 1930s. A resident of Shaker Heights, Ohio's first Garden City, H. A. Stahl developed Ridgewood as an ambitious "model village" project patterned along the lines of and rivaling the earlier Shaker Heights project with "churches, schools, motion picture theater, community house, and other features forming a part of all well-developed residence communities.". Ridgewood was designed and marketed as a Garden City on 1,000 acres of land to accommodate about 40,000 residents "325 feet above Lake Erie, in the healthiest section of the South Side, free from the smoke of industries, or the congestion and noises of sections nearer the Public Square."

On January 1, 1931, Parma became a city with a population of 13,899. Whereas the incorporation of the village of Parma was met with much optimism, the newly established city of Parma faced the uncertainty of the Great Depression which had almost entirely stopped its growth. Money was scarce, tax income was limited, and some began to talk of annexation of both the city and school district to Cleveland. Both annexation issues, however, were soundly defeated as Parma voters overwhelmingly voted against them and silenced proponents of annexation. Not long after this, Parma was once again solvent due in large part to the newly created Gallagher Act, a 1936 Ohio law that aided cities threatened with bankruptcy and the determination of Parma's Auditor, Sam Nowlin. By 1941, a building boom appeared to be underway in Parma just as the United States was about to enter World War II.

After World War II, Parma once again began to experience tremendous growth as young families began moving from Cleveland into the suburbs. Between 1950 and 1960, Parma's population soared from 28,897 to 82,845. By 1956, Parma was unchallenged as the fastest growing city in the United States. The population peaked in 1970 at 100,216.

In 2016, Parma's population had declined to 81,601, though it remains one of the Cleveland area's top three destinations young adults (aged 22 to 34) are increasingly choosing as a place to live, along with Lakewood and downtown Cleveland and in 2016 was recognized by Businessweek as one of the best places to raise kids in Ohio.

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 81,601 people, 34,489 households, and 21,646 families residing in the city. The population density was 4,076.0 inhabitants per square mile (1,573.8/km2). There were 36,608 housing units at an average density of 1,828.6 per square mile (706.0/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 93.0% White, 2.3% African American, 0.2% Native American, 1.9% Asian, 1.0% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.6% of the population. According to the 2010 Census., 22.5% were of German ancestry, 17.6% Polish, 14.8% Italian, 13.8% Irish, 7.4% Slovak, 6.7% English, 5.3% Ukrainian, 2.6% French, 2.2% Serbian, 1.9% Czech, 1.4% Arab, and 1.2% of Croatian, Lithuanian, or Russian ancestries. In regard to languages spoken, 87.03% spoke English, 2.26% Ukrainian, 1.68% Polish, 1.27% Spanish, 1.24% German, and 1.18% Italian as their first language.

There were 34,489 households, of which 27.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.7% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 37.2% were non-families. 31.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.95.

The median age in the city was 41.5 years. 20.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.5% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 25.7% were from 25 to 44; 27.7% were from 45 to 64; and 17.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.1% male and 51.9% female.

The median income for a household in the city was $50,198, the median income for a family was $60,696 and the mean income for a family was $68,828. The per capita income for the city was $25,064. The poverty rate in the city was 10.2%. This was low in comparison to other large Ohio cities as well as the state's individual poverty rate of 15.4%.

In 2014, Parma ranked as the third safest city in the United States with a population of 25,000 or more by Neighborhood Scout. In 2014, Parma had a crime index of 90 meaning it was safer than 90% of cities in the United States.

About Ohio

Ohio is an eastern U.S. state located in the northeast corner of the Midwestern region of the Ohio River Valley. Ohio is bordered by the states of West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia to its south, Kentucky and Indiana to its northwest, and Michigan to its southwest. Ohio is also one of the few states in the union with a majority of its population concentrated in the southern region. The largest city in Ohio is Columbus, which is the state's capital. Ohio is divided into four major counties namely Cuyahoga, Cleveland, Columbus and Medina.

Ohio's demography is predominantly rural. Ohio ranks tenth among states in terms of its population of rural resident population. Ohio's largest city, Columbus, has a population of about five million. A smaller rural county in Ohio called Geauga, is the site of a major aluminum production plant that is one of the most densely populated places in Ohio. Demographics of this rural area is younger than the national average and more married than the national average.

Ohio's economy is based on its reliance on tourism. The state of Ohio is home to a large number of visitors who come to visit the beautiful landscape and to invest in business and other forms of personal income. Ohio's economy depends on its dependence on tourism and the main sources of job creation in this state have been higher education and medical technology. As a result, more people have been moving to Ohio in search of higher education and better healthcare.

Because of its strong economy and reliance on tourism, Ohio has developed a fairly homogenous demography. It is the most ethnically diverse state in the United States. Ohio's ethnic diversity results in a lower rate of urban poverty than the national average and the same as the median income level. Demography also contributes to Ohio's lower rate of child poverty as well as the lower rate of adult poverty.

Ohio's poverty rate is thirty-three percent, slightly higher than the national average. This means that families in the bottom twenty percent of the income distribution are Ohio's middle class. However, because of their lower incomes, they still have above average health insurance and are not as likely to live in poverty. Ohio's poor economic outlook contributes to the fact that about fifteen percent of its residents live in poverty, more than any other state in the country.

On the other end of the income scale, about forty percent of Ohio's residents live in the upper middle class. Ohio's middle class is particularly vulnerable to the effects of economic conditions. The downward trend of the Ohio job market has made it easier for people at the bottom of the economic scale to fall into poverty. Ohioans making less than twenty-five hundred dollars per year are considered to be in the upper middle class in this state and are thus less likely to be in poverty. Those earning over forty thousand dollars per year are in what is known as the middle income group and are far more likely to be in poverty than the typical Ohioan.

Ohio's poverty rates for children are especially troubling. They are higher than the national average and are far more likely to live in poverty. Two-thirds of Ohio school kids live in poverty, and many of these children are from broken or disadvantaged families. One of every four Ohio school students lives in poverty, making it one of the most densely populated states in the U.S. Another troubling fact about Ohio's children is that their educational levels are on par with those in other states but their reading and writing scores are far lower than the national average. These children are also less likely to have received all of their needed vaccinations.

While Ohio is one of the wealthiest states in the U.S., it is also one of its poorest when it comes to the health of its children. One of every four Ohio children has been diagnosed with asthma; one of every eight Ohio children experience what is known as "the flu"; one of every thirty Ohio children have what is known as "wood cough"; one of every twenty Ohio children have what is called "bronchitis" and what is also known as "yeast infections". All these illnesses and diseases in children are a stark reminder of how important it is to pay attention to health and nutrition when you are feeding your family. The better nourished we are, the better our children will perform in school and in society. By helping to ensure that your child gets the proper nutrition, you will give him the best opportunity to succeed.