Looking for a Digital Marketing Agency?

We’re a team of twenty-three web, digital marketing, SEO, and operations professionals. Heaviside Group was founded in 2011 as a side project and has continued to grow and expand year after year.

Our group is divided into four internal teams: Web, Digital Marketing, SEO, and Operations. Each team has specialists in those disciplines, and they work together to deliver projects accurately and on-time. Everything is managed by our operations team, which provides sales, customer service, and project management support to our clients.

In 2017, we launched our Heaviside Digital platform, designed to provide high-quality web, digital marketing, and SEO services to businesses with lower marketing budgets.

SERVICES

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Total Managed Digital – Bronze
5.0
(4)
$1,999.00 / month and a $1,200.00 setup fees
Everything you need - covers website management, Complete SEO Standard, and Google Ads.
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Total Managed Digital – Local Bronze
5.0
(4)
$1,999.00 / month and a $1,200.00 setup fees
Everything you need - includes Complete Local SEO, and either Facebook Ads Standard OR Google Ads Standard.
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Total Managed Digital – Silver
5.0
(4)
$2,999.00 / month and a $1,800.00 setup fees
Everything you need - covers website management, Complete SEO Premium, Google Ads, and Facebook Ads.
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Total Managed Digital – Local Silver
5.0
(4)
$2,999.00 / month and a $1,800.00 setup fees
Everything you need - includes Complete Local SEO, Managed Digital Marketing, and Managed Link Building Basic.
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REVIEWS

campuscommon
campuscommon
5/5

This is the second time we worked with Heaviside and they are always professional and responsive. Appreciate the work and effort.

2 years ago
Robert Spencer
Robert Spencer
5/5

I've been in and around SEO since the early 2000s and tried both DIY and agencies. Very impressed with Heaviside both for running their operations / customer service well, as well as (arguably most importantly) the quality of SEO keyword research and FB ad management they provide. Whether you're a standalone business owner or setting up your own digital marketing agency and want to outsource, HVG provide solid, no-nonsense results at competitive (but realistic) prices.

2 years ago
mackdonald ireland
mackdonald ireland
5/5

Great service and great results - thank you very much!

2 years ago
simodeema
simodeema
5/5

Great work from heavisidegroup, really loved the results. The instructions were very clear and easy to follow. Thank you! 🙂

2 years ago
nathan jones
nathan jones
5/5

Fantastic experience. Quick, professional. I will continue to use them as well as convert my other business over to their service.

2 years ago

About Service

A digital marketing agency can help you expand your business and improve the overall performance of your company. But, you have to make sure that you work with an agency that knows what they're doing. Not all agencies are equal, especially when it comes to digital marketing. Let's take a look at the traits of a great digital marketing agency.

First of all, a digital marketing agency isn't like your regular in-house agency. In-house agencies are usually focused on results - they know how to work with a certain demographic group to get the right kind of responses. A digital marketing agency, however, is a lead-generating and brand-development engine. This means that if you want to work with them, you have to be willing to do whatever it takes to get their attention. If you go into an agency without knowing what kind of results you want or what you plan on getting out of it, you might not find the right talent.

Digital marketing agencies have to be able to put the data and findings they collect to work for their client. If they aren't good with this, your business could very well be hurt because they wouldn't know which types of campaigns to pursue or which strategies to use to benefit from the data they collect. This means you need to have a good relationship with your digital marketing agency, or you'll just be throwing your money away on ineffective campaigns.

Another characteristic of a great digital marketing agency makes it easier to work together. You can tell if an agency has the right people by the way they talk to you. It's clear when someone isn't on the same page as you - and that's when it's time to move on and find someone who will. In a traditional marketing organization, the people who make the decisions are usually all on the same page; there is rarely a difference between the top person and the middle person. You don't want to work with someone who only knows his/her own opinion, and who has no interest in what you want to do or what you have to say.

When working with a digital marketing agency from the uk based scene, one thing you want to look for is an agency that values what you stand for. If they do, then they'll help you make all of your campaigns successful. From the moment you start talking about ideas, you need to focus on the value that you and your brand offer. Your values and goals should be what drives everything you do, from the content marketing to the promotions to the brand positioning. For example, your company's values may be centered around being environmentally friendly, but your brand may also be centered around using promotional tools that are printable, affordable, or unique. Both of these things are important to you, so you need to make sure your agency values both.

Finally, if you find an agency that will work closely with you, then you have found a great partner. You should never restrict your creative input to just one person, because you'll be missing out on a lot. Look for digital marketing agencies that will get multiple opinions, so you can weigh your options before making a final decision. Make sure that the people working with you understand what you stand for, what your goals are, and what you're willing to go through in order to achieve those goals. You need to trust your creative partner more than ever before if you want to work with an agency that will help grow your business.

Digital Marketing Agency Toledo, Ohio

ABOUT Toledo

The region was part of a larger area controlled by the historic tribes of the Wyandot and the people of the Council of Three Fires (Ojibwe, Potawatomi and Odawa). The French established trading posts in the area by 1680 to take advantage of the lucrative fur trade. The Odawa moved from Manitoulin Island and the Bruce Peninsula at the invitation of the French, who established a trading post at Fort Detroit, about 60 miles to the north. They settled an area extending into northwest Ohio. By the early 18th century, the Odawa occupied areas along most of the Maumee River to its mouth. They served as middlemen between the French and tribes further to the west and north. The Wyandot occupied central Ohio, and the Shawnee and Lenape occupied the southern areas.

When the city of Toledo was preparing to pave its streets, it surveyed "two prehistoric semicircular earthworks, presumably for stockades." One was at the intersection of Clayton and Oliver streets on the south bank of Swan Creek; the other was at the intersection of Fassett and Fort streets on the right bank of the Maumee River. Such earthworks were typical of mound-building peoples.

According to Charles E. Slocum, the American military built Fort Industry at the mouth of Swan Creek about 1805, as a temporary stockade. No official reports support the 19th-century tradition of its earlier history there.

The United States continued to work to extinguish land claims of Native Americans. In the Treaty of Detroit (1807), the above four tribes ceded a large land area to the United States of what became southeastern Michigan and northwestern Ohio, to the mouth of the Maumee River (where Toledo later developed). Reserves for the Odawa were set aside in northwestern Ohio for a limited period of time. The Native Americans signed the treaty at Detroit, Michigan, on November 17, 1807, with William Hull, governor of the Michigan Territory and superintendent of Indian affairs, as the sole representative of the U.S.

More European-American settlers entered the area over the next few years, but many fled during the War of 1812, when British forces raided the area with their Indian allies. Resettlement began around 1818 after a Cincinnati syndicate purchased a 974-acre (3.9 km2) tract at the mouth of Swan Creek and named it Port Lawrence, developing it as the modern downtown area of Toledo. Immediately to the north of that, another syndicate founded the town of Vistula, the historic north end. These two towns bordered each other across Cherry Street. This is why present-day streets on the street's northeast side run at a slightly different angle from those southwest of it.

In 1824, the Ohio state legislature authorized the construction of the Miami and Erie Canal and in 1833, its Wabash and Erie Canal extension. The canal's purpose was to connect the city of Cincinnati to Lake Erie for water transportation to eastern markets, including to New York City via the Erie Canal and Hudson River. At that time no highways had been built in the state, and it was very difficult for goods produced locally to reach the larger markets east of the Appalachian Mountains. During the canal's planning phase, many small towns along the northern shores of Maumee River heavily competed to be the ending terminus of the canal, knowing it would give them a profitable status. The towns of Port Lawrence and Vistula merged in 1833 to better compete against the upriver towns of Waterville and Maumee.

The inhabitants of this joined settlement chose the name Toledo:

Despite Toledo's efforts, the canal built the final terminus in Manhattan, one-half mile (800 m) to the north of Toledo, because it was closer to Lake Erie. As a compromise, the state placed two sidecuts before the terminus, one in Toledo at Swan Creek and another in Maumee, about 10 miles to the southwest.

Among the numerous treaties made between the Ottawa and the United States were two signed in this area: at Miami (Maumee) Bay in 1831 and Maumee, Ohio, upriver of Toledo, in 1833. These actions were among US purchases or exchanges of land in order to accomplish Indian Removal of the Ottawa from areas wanted for European-American settlement. The last of the Odawa did not leave this area until 1839, when Ottokee, grandson of Pontiac, led his band from their village at the mouth of the Maumee River to Indian Territory in Kansas.

An almost bloodless conflict between Ohio and the Michigan Territory, called the Toledo War (1835–1836), was "fought" over a narrow strip of land from the Indiana border to Lake Erie, now containing the city and the suburbs of Sylvania and Oregon, Ohio. The strip—which varied between five and eight miles (13 km) in width—was claimed by both the state of Ohio and the Michigan Territory due to conflicting legislation concerning the location of the Ohio-Michigan state line. Militias from both states were sent to the border but never engaged. The only casualty of the conflict was a Michigan deputy sheriff—stabbed in the leg with a pen knife by Two Stickney during the arrest of his elder brother, One Stickney—and the loss of two horses, two pigs and a few chickens stolen from an Ohio farm by lost members of the Michigan militia. Major Benjamin Franklin Stickney, father of One and Two Stickney, had been instrumental in pushing Congress to rule in favor of Ohio gaining Toledo. In the end, the state of Ohio was awarded the land after the state of Michigan was given a larger portion of the Upper Peninsula in exchange. Stickney Avenue in Toledo is named for Major Stickney.

Toledo was very slow to expand during its first two decades of settlement. The first lot was sold in the Port Lawrence section of the city in 1833. It held 1,205 persons in 1835, and five years later it had gained just seven more persons. Settlers came and went quickly through Toledo and between 1833 and 1836, ownership of land had changed so many times that none of the original parties remained in the town. The canal and its Toledo sidecut entrance were completed in 1843. Soon after the canal was functional, the new canal boats had become too large to use the shallow waters at the terminus in Manhattan. More boats began using the Swan Creek sidecut than its official terminus, quickly putting the Manhattan warehouses out of business and triggering a rush to move business to Toledo. Most of Manhattan's residents moved out by 1844.

The 1850 census recorded Toledo as having 3,829 residents and Manhattan 541. The 1860 census shows Toledo with a population of 13,768 and Manhattan with 788. While the towns were only a mile apart, Toledo grew by 359% in ten years. Manhattan's growth was on a small base and never competed, given the drawbacks of its lesser canal outlet. By the 1880s, Toledo expanded over the vacant streets of Manhattan and Tremainsville, a small town to the west.

In the last half of the 19th century, railroads slowly began to replace canals as the major form of transportation. They were faster and had greater capacity. Toledo soon became a hub for several railroad companies and a hotspot for industries such as furniture producers, carriage makers, breweries, glass manufacturers, and others. Large immigrant populations came to the area.

In the 1920s, Toledo had one of the highest rates of industrial growth in the United States.

Toledo continued to expand in population and industry, but because of its dependence on manufacturing, the city was hit hard by the Great Depression. Many large-scale WPA projects were constructed to reemploy citizens in the 1930s. Some of these include the amphitheater and aquarium at the Toledo Zoo and a major expansion to the Toledo Museum of Art.

The post-war job boom and Great Migration brought thousands of African Americans to Toledo to work in industrial jobs, where they had previously been denied. Due to redlining, many of them settled along Dorr Street, which, during the 1950s and 60s was lined with flourishing black-owned businesses and homes. Desegregation, a failed urban renewal project, and the construction of I-75 displaced those residents and left behind a struggling community with minimal resources, even as it also drew more established, middle-class people, white and black, out of center cities for newer housing. The city rebounded, but the slump of American manufacturing in the second half of the 20th century during industrial restructuring cost many jobs.

By the 1980s, Toledo had a depressed economy. The destruction of many buildings downtown, along with several failed business ventures in housing in the core, led to a reverse city-suburb wealth problem common in small cities with land to spare.

In 2018, Cleveland-Cliffs, Inc. invested $700 million into an East Toledo location as the site of a new hot-briquetted iron plant, designed to modernize the steel industry. The plant is slated to create over 1200 jobs and be completed in 2020.

Several initiatives have been taken by Toledo's citizens to improve the cityscape by urban gardening and revitalizing their communities. Local artists, supported by organizations like the Arts Commission of Greater Toledo and the Ohio Arts Council, have contributed an array of murals and beautification works to replace long standing blight. Many downtown historical buildings such as the Oliver House and Standart Lofts have been renovated into restaurants, condominiums, offices and art galleries.

As of the 2010 census, the city proper had a population of 287,128. It is the principal city in the Toledo Metropolitan Statistical Area which had a population of 651,429 and was the sixth-largest metropolitan area in the state of Ohio, behind Cleveland, Columbus, Cincinnati, Dayton, and Akron. The larger Toledo-Fremont Combined Statistical Area had a population of 712,373. According to the Toledo Metropolitan Council of Governments, the Toledo/Northwest Ohio region of 10 counties has over 1 million residents.

The U.S. Census Bureau estimated Toledo's population as 297,806 in 2006 and 295,029 in 2007. In response to an appeal by the City of Toledo, the Census Bureau's July 2007 estimate was revised to 316,851, slightly more than in 2000, which would have been the city's first population gain in 40 years. However, the 2010 census figures released in March 2011 showed the population as of April 1, 2010, at 287,208, indicating a 25% loss of population since its zenith in 1970.

As of the census of 2010, there were 287,208 people, 119,730 households, and 68,364 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,559.4 inhabitants per square mile (1,374.3/km2). There were 138,039 housing units at an average density of 1,710.7 per square mile (660.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 64.8% White, 27.2% African American, 0.4% Native American, 1.1% Asian, 2.6% from other races, and 3.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.4% of the population (The majority are Mexican American at 5.1%.) Non-Hispanic Whites were 61.4% of the population in 2010, down from 84% in 1970.

There were 119,730 households, of which 30.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 31.6% were married couples living together, 19.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.7% had a male householder with no wife present, and 42.9% were non-families. 34.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.33 and the average family size was 3.01. There was a total of 139,871 housing units in the city, of which 10,946 (9.8%) were vacant.

The median age in the city was 34.2 years. 24% of residents were under the age of 18; 12.8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 26.3% were from 25 to 44; 24.8% were from 45 to 64; and 12.1% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.4% male and 51.6% female.

As of the census of 2000, there were 313,619 people, and 77,355 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,890.2 people per square mile (1,502.0/km2). There were 139,871 housing units at an average density of 1,734.9 per square mile (669.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 70.2% White, 23.5% African American, 0.3% Native American,1.0% Asian, 0.0% Pacific Islander, 2.3% from other races, and 2.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.5% of the population in 2000. The most common ancestries cited were German (23.4%), Irish (10.8%), Polish (10.1%), English (6.0%), American (3.9%), Italian (3.0%), Hungarian, (2.0%), Dutch (1.4%), and Arab (1.2%).

In 2000 there were 128,925 households in Toledo, out of which 29.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.2% were married couples living together, 17.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.0% were non-families. 32.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the city the population was spread out, with 26.2% under the age of 18, 11.0% from 18 to 24, 29.8% from 25 to 44, 19.8% from 45 to 64, and 13.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females, there were 97.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $32,546, and the median income for a family was $41,175. Males had a median income of $35,407 versus $25,023 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,388. About 14.2% of families and 17.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.9% of those under age 18 and 10.4% of those age 65 or over.

In 2018, the city was ranked 43rd of the Top 100 Most Dangerous Cities in America.

In the second decade of the 21st century, the city had a gradual peak in violent crime. In 2010, there was a combined total of 3,272 burglaries, 511 robberies, 753 aggravated assaults, 25 homicides, as well as 574 motor vehicle thefts out of what was then a decreasing population of 287,208. In 2011, there were 1,562 aggravated assaults, 30 homicides, 1,152 robberies, 8,366 burglaries, and 1,465 cases of motor vehicle theft. In 2012, there were a combined total of 39 murders, 2,015 aggravated assaults, 6,739 burglaries, and 1,334 cases of motor vehicle theft. In 2013 it had a drop in the crime rate. According to a state government task force, Toledo has been identified as the fourth-largest recruitment site for human trafficking in the US.

About Ohio

Ohio is an eastern U.S. state located in the northeast corner of the Midwestern region of the Ohio River Valley. Ohio is bordered by the states of West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia to its south, Kentucky and Indiana to its northwest, and Michigan to its southwest. Ohio is also one of the few states in the union with a majority of its population concentrated in the southern region. The largest city in Ohio is Columbus, which is the state's capital. Ohio is divided into four major counties namely Cuyahoga, Cleveland, Columbus and Medina.

Ohio's demography is predominantly rural. Ohio ranks tenth among states in terms of its population of rural resident population. Ohio's largest city, Columbus, has a population of about five million. A smaller rural county in Ohio called Geauga, is the site of a major aluminum production plant that is one of the most densely populated places in Ohio. Demographics of this rural area is younger than the national average and more married than the national average.

Ohio's economy is based on its reliance on tourism. The state of Ohio is home to a large number of visitors who come to visit the beautiful landscape and to invest in business and other forms of personal income. Ohio's economy depends on its dependence on tourism and the main sources of job creation in this state have been higher education and medical technology. As a result, more people have been moving to Ohio in search of higher education and better healthcare.

Because of its strong economy and reliance on tourism, Ohio has developed a fairly homogenous demography. It is the most ethnically diverse state in the United States. Ohio's ethnic diversity results in a lower rate of urban poverty than the national average and the same as the median income level. Demography also contributes to Ohio's lower rate of child poverty as well as the lower rate of adult poverty.

Ohio's poverty rate is thirty-three percent, slightly higher than the national average. This means that families in the bottom twenty percent of the income distribution are Ohio's middle class. However, because of their lower incomes, they still have above average health insurance and are not as likely to live in poverty. Ohio's poor economic outlook contributes to the fact that about fifteen percent of its residents live in poverty, more than any other state in the country.

On the other end of the income scale, about forty percent of Ohio's residents live in the upper middle class. Ohio's middle class is particularly vulnerable to the effects of economic conditions. The downward trend of the Ohio job market has made it easier for people at the bottom of the economic scale to fall into poverty. Ohioans making less than twenty-five hundred dollars per year are considered to be in the upper middle class in this state and are thus less likely to be in poverty. Those earning over forty thousand dollars per year are in what is known as the middle income group and are far more likely to be in poverty than the typical Ohioan.

Ohio's poverty rates for children are especially troubling. They are higher than the national average and are far more likely to live in poverty. Two-thirds of Ohio school kids live in poverty, and many of these children are from broken or disadvantaged families. One of every four Ohio school students lives in poverty, making it one of the most densely populated states in the U.S. Another troubling fact about Ohio's children is that their educational levels are on par with those in other states but their reading and writing scores are far lower than the national average. These children are also less likely to have received all of their needed vaccinations.

While Ohio is one of the wealthiest states in the U.S., it is also one of its poorest when it comes to the health of its children. One of every four Ohio children has been diagnosed with asthma; one of every eight Ohio children experience what is known as "the flu"; one of every thirty Ohio children have what is known as "wood cough"; one of every twenty Ohio children have what is called "bronchitis" and what is also known as "yeast infections". All these illnesses and diseases in children are a stark reminder of how important it is to pay attention to health and nutrition when you are feeding your family. The better nourished we are, the better our children will perform in school and in society. By helping to ensure that your child gets the proper nutrition, you will give him the best opportunity to succeed.