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We’re a team of twenty-three web, digital marketing, SEO, and operations professionals. Heaviside Group was founded in 2011 as a side project and has continued to grow and expand year after year.

Our group is divided into four internal teams: Web, Digital Marketing, SEO, and Operations. Each team has specialists in those disciplines, and they work together to deliver projects accurately and on-time. Everything is managed by our operations team, which provides sales, customer service, and project management support to our clients.

In 2017, we launched our Heaviside Digital platform, designed to provide high-quality web, digital marketing, and SEO services to businesses with lower marketing budgets.

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Up to one-hour phone consultation, with screen share if needed. Troubleshoot, audit, review, etc. Audit may reduce live call time.
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Facebook Ads – Basic
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$300.00 / month
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$450.00 / month
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REVIEWS

jeffersonlew232
jeffersonlew232
5/5

You did an amazing job

2 years ago
driftersldn
driftersldn
5/5

Really diligent and patient, thank you so much!

2 years ago
socialdesigners
socialdesigners
5/5

Another month with heavisidegroup and I'm very happy with their work!

2 years ago
jacksum
jacksum
5/5

They did manage the ad campaign on fb as promised .... although we didn’t see any sales they did do their part in running the ads and managing them as promised .

2 years ago
milcaguadalupe
milcaguadalupe
5/5

It was a very good experience. I appreciate their patience and hard work.

2 years ago

About Service

A Facebook Ads Agency basically handles Facebook marketing campaigns for the clients. These days, there has never been a greater time to begin a new business online than right now. One of today's most popular lifestyle companies you could develop from nothing is a Facebook marketing agency. With the huge number of potential customers on Facebook, it's vital to constantly drive qualified traffic to one's business website. A Facebook campaign can also be used to generate lead generation which can be extremely profitable.

When it comes to creating Facebook ads campaigns, it's important to stay as generic as possible. Don't give away too much information about your company's specific product or service up front. Targeting specific demographics is ideal and by targeting specific markets you'll easily be able to increase your customer base. A Facebook ads agency has the expertise to create ad campaigns that are completely tailored to each and every client. They know how to effectively target demographics and create an ad campaign that will deliver results.

Targeting specific markets is essential because this way you'll be more likely to retain those customers. Remember, a person who isn't interested in your product is likely not going to click on your ad. However, they could still be on your mailing list. Using the data from your Facebook ads clients, the ad marketers will create ads that will target the people who want what you have to offer, and you'll increase your sales!

It's not hard to generate leads with a Facebook ads agency either. By targeting your ads based on keywords, location, gender, age or any other form of demographic you'll quickly get clients clicking through to your website. It's that simple and effective. So you don't need to spend hours posting messages on social media sites when you could be generating leads on autopilot with a great advertising agency and web marketing tool.

Don't believe that the sky is the limit with advertising online. There are so many businesses trying to market online that it can be difficult to find quality leads that actually want to buy something. But you won't have to spend all day posting messages on social networking sites trying to drum up business as you can let a professional advertising agency to do that for you. The real money is in quality campaigns that target people who are actually looking for what you have to offer. It's much easier to sell to the masses than it is to sell to a group of individuals who are already halfway vested.

Once you've got quality leads, your next step is to convert them into sales. That's where retargeting ad campaigns come in. These campaigns allow you to target people already interested in what you have to offer but who are not ready to make a purchase just yet. With retargeting campaigns you simply need to send them a message asking them if they are ready to take that next step and give you their name, email, phone number, and the URL where they can find more information about your products and services. You can then follow up with a second message asking them if they still want to take the action you requested of them. By doing this you're increasing your chances of converting those leads into actual sales, which will increase your chances of making more money from Facebook ads.

ABOUT Buffalo

The first inhabitants of the New York State are believed to have been nomadic Paleo-Indians, who migrated after the disappearance of Pleistocene glaciers during or before 7000 BCE.

Around 1000 CE, the Woodland period began, marked by the rise of the Iroquois Confederacy and its tribes throughout the state.

During French exploration of the region in 1620, the region was occupied simultaneously by the agrarian Erie people, a tribe outside of the Five Nations of the Iroquois southwest of Buffalo Creek, and the Wenro people or Wenrohronon, an Iroquoian-speaking tribal offshoot of the large Neutral Nation who lived along the inland south shore of Lake Ontario and at the east end of Lake Erie and a bit of its northern shore. For trading, the Neutral people made a living by growing tobacco and hemp to trade with the Iroquois, using animal paths or warpaths to travel and move goods across the state. These paths were later paved, and now function as major roads.

Later, during the Beaver Wars of the 1640s-1650s, the combined warriors of the Five Nations of the Iroquois conquered the populous Neutrals and their peninsular territory, while the Senecas alone took out the Wenro and their territory, c. 1651–1653. Soon after, the Iroquois destroyed Erie nation and territory over their assistance to Huron people during the Beaver Wars.

Louis Hennepin and Sieur de La Salle made the earliest European discoveries of the upper Niagara and Ontario regions in the late 1600s. On August 7, 1679, La Salle launched a vessel, Le Griffon, that became the first full-sized ship to sail across the Great Lakes before it disappeared in Green Bay, Wisconsin.

After the American Revolution, the Province of New York—now a U.S. state—began westward expansion, looking for habitable land by following trends of the Iroquois. Land near fresh water was of considerable importance. New York and Massachusetts were fighting for the territory Buffalo lies on, and Massachusetts had the right to purchase all but a one-mile (1600-meter) wide portion of land. The rights to the Massachusetts' territories were sold to Robert Morris in 1791, and two years later to the Holland Land Company.

As a result of the war, in which the Iroquois tribe sided with the British Army, Iroquois territory was gradually reduced in the mid-to-late-1700s by European settlers through successive treaties statewide, such as the Treaty of Fort Stanwix (1784), the First Treaty of Buffalo Creek (1788), and the Treaty of Geneseo (1797). The Iroquois were corralled onto reservations, including Buffalo Creek. By the end of the 18th century, only 338 square miles (216,000 acres; 880 km2; 88,000 ha) of reservation territory remained.

The first white settlers along the creek were prisoners captured during the Revolutionary War. The first resident and landowner of Buffalo with a permanent presence was Captain William Johnston, a white Iroquois interpreter who had been in the area since the days after the Revolutionary War and who the Senecas granted creekside land as a gift of appreciation. His house stood at present-day Washington and Seneca streets. Former enslaved man Joseph "Black Joe" Hodges, and Cornelius Winney, a Dutch trader from Albany who arrived in 1789, were early settlers along the mouth of Buffalo Creek.

On July 20, 1793, the Holland Land Purchase was completed, containing the land of present-day Buffalo, brokered by Dutch investors from Holland. The Treaty of Big Tree removed Iroquois title to lands west of the Genesee River in 1797. In the fall of 1797, Joseph Ellicott, the architect who helped survey Washington, D.C. with brother Andrew, was appointed as the Chief of Survey for the Holland Land Company. Over the next year, he began to survey the tract of land at the mouth of Buffalo Creek. This was completed in 1803, and the new village boundaries extended from the creekside in the south to present-day Chippewa Street in the north and Carolina Street to the west, which is where most settlers remained for the first decade of the 19th century.[citation needed] Although the company named the settlement "New Amsterdam," the name did not catch on, reverting to Buffalo within ten years. Buffalo had the first road to Pennsylvania built in 1802 for migrants passing through to the Connecticut Western Reserve in Ohio.

In 1804, Ellicott designed a radial grid plan that would branch out from the village forming bicycle-like spokes, interrupted by diagonals, like the system used in the nation's capital. In the middle of the village was the intersection of eight streets, in what would become Niagara Square. Several blocks to the southeast he designed a semicircle fronting Main Street with an elongated park green, formerly his estate. This would be known as Shelton Square, at that time the center of the city (which would be dramatically altered in the mid-20th century), with the intersecting streets bearing the names of Dutch Holland Land Company members, today Erie, Church and Niagara streets.Lafayette Square also lies one block to the north, which was then bounded by streets bearing Iroquois names.

According to an early resident, the village had sixteen residences, a schoolhouse and two stores in 1806, primarily near Main, Swan and Seneca streets. There were also blacksmith shops, a tavern and a drugstore. The streets were small at 40 feet wide, and the village was still surrounded by woods. The first lot sold by the Holland Land Company was on September 11, 1806, to Zerah Phelps. By 1808, lots would sell from $25 to $50.

In 1804, Buffalo's population was estimated at 400, similar to Batavia, but Erie County's growth was behind Chautauqua, Genesee and Wyoming counties. Neighboring village Black Rock to the northwest (today a Buffalo neighborhood) was also an important center. Horatio J. Spafford noted in A Gazetteer of the State of New York that in fact, despite the growth the village of Buffalo had, Black Rock "is deemed a better trading site for a great trading town than that of Buffalo," especially when considering the regional profile of mundane roads extending eastward. Before the east-to-west turnpike[further explanation needed] was completed, travelling from Albany to Buffalo would take a week, while even a trip from nearby Williamsville to Batavia could take upwards of three days.

Although slavery was rare in the state, limited instances of slavery had taken place in Buffalo during the early part of the 19th century. General Peter Buell Porter is said to have had five slaves during his time in Black Rock, and several news ads also advertised slaves for sale.

In 1810, a courthouse was built. By 1811, the population was 500, with many people farming or doing manual labor. The first newspaper to be published was the Buffalo Gazette in October that same year.

On December 31, 1813, the British burned Buffalo and the village of Black Rock after the Battle of Buffalo. The battle and subsequent fire was in response to the unprovoked destruction of Niagara-on-the-Lake, then known as "Newark," by American forces. On August 4, 1814, British forces under Lt. Colonel John Tucker and Lt. Colonel William Drummond, General Gordon Drummond's nephew, attempted to raid Black Rock and Buffalo as part of a diversion to force an early surrender at Fort Erie the next day, but were defeated by a small force of American riflemen under Major Lodwick Morgan at the Battle of Conjocta Creek, and withdrew back into Canada. Consequently, Fort Erie's siege under Gordon Drummond later failed, and British forces withdrew. Though only three buildings remained in the village, rebuilding was swift, finishing in 1815.

The population in 1840 was 18,213. The village of Buffalo was part of and the seat of Niagara County until the legislature passed an act separating them on April 2, 1861.

On October 26, 1825, the Erie Canal was completed, formed from part of Buffalo Creek, with Buffalo a port-of-call for settlers heading westward. At the time, the population was about 2,400. By 1826, the 130 sq. mile Buffalo Creek Reservation at the western border of the village was transferred to Buffalo. The Erie Canal brought a surge in population and commerce, which led Buffalo to incorporate as a city in 1832. The canal area was mature by 1847, with passenger and cargo ship activity leading to congestion in the harbor.

The mid-1800s saw a population boom, with the city doubling in size from 1845 to 1855. In 1855, almost two-thirds of the city's population were foreign-born immigrants, largely a mix of unskilled or educated Irish and German Catholics, who began self-segregating in different parts of the city. The Irish immigrants planted their roots along the railroad-heavy Buffalo River and Erie Canal to the southeast, to which there is still a heavy presence today; German immigrants found their way to the East Side, living a more laid-back, residential life. Some immigrants were apprehensive about the change of environment and left the city for the western region, while others tried to stay behind in the hopes of expanding their native cultures.

Fugitive black slaves began to make their way northward to Buffalo in the 1840s, and many settled on the city's East Side. In 1845, construction began on the Macedonia Baptist Church, a meeting spot in the Michigan and William Street neighborhood where blacks first settled. Political activity surrounding the anti-slavery movement took place in Buffalo during this time, including conventions held by the National Convention of Colored Citizens and the Liberty Party and its offshoots. Buffalo was a terminus point of the Underground Railroad with many fugitive slaves crossing the Niagara River to Fort Erie, Ontario in search of freedom.

During the 1840s, Buffalo's port continued to develop. Both passenger and commercial traffic expanded with some 93,000 passengers heading west from the port of Buffalo.[better source needed] Grain and commercial goods shipments led to repeated expansion of the harbor.[citation needed] In 1843, the world's first steam-powered grain elevator was constructed by local merchant Joseph Dart and engineer Robert Dunbar. "Dart's Elevator" enabled faster unloading of lake freighters along with the transshipment of grain in bulk from barges, canal boats, and rail cars. By 1850, the city's population was 81,000.

In 1860, many railway companies and lines crossed through and terminated in Buffalo. Major ones were the Buffalo, Bradford and Pittsburgh Railroad (1859), Buffalo and Erie Railroad and the New York Central Railroad (1853). During this time, Buffalonians controlled a quarter of all shipping traffic on Lake Erie, and shipbuilding was a thriving industry for the city.

Later, the Lehigh Valley Railroad would have its line terminate at Buffalo in 1867.

At the dawn of the 20th century, local mills were among the first to benefit from hydroelectric power generated by the Niagara River. The city got the nickname The City of Light at this time due to the widespread electric lighting. It was also part of the automobile revolution, hosting the brass era car builders Pierce Arrow and the Seven Little Buffaloes early in the century. At the same time, an exit of local entrepreneurs and industrial titans brought about a nascent stage that would see the city lose its competitiveness against Pittsburgh, Cleveland and Detroit.

President William McKinley was shot and mortally wounded by an anarchist at the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo on September 6, 1901. McKinley died eight days later and Theodore Roosevelt was sworn in at the Wilcox Mansion. The Great Depression of 1929–39 saw severe unemployment, especially among working-class men. The New Deal relief programs operated full force. The city became a stronghold of labor unions and the Democratic Party.

During World War II, Buffalo saw the return of prosperity and full employment due to its position as a manufacturing center. As one of the most populous cities of the 1950s, Buffalo's economy revolved almost entirely on its manufacturing base. Major companies such as Republic Steel and Lackawanna Steel employed tens of thousands of Buffalonians. Integrated national shipping routes would use the Soo Locks near Lake Superior and a vast network of railroads and yards that crossed the city.

Lobbying by local businesses and interest groups against the St. Lawrence Seaway began in the 1920s, long before its construction in 1957, which cut the city off from valuable trade routes. Its approval was reinforced by legislation shortly before its construction. Shipbuilding in Buffalo, such as the American Ship Building Company, shut down in 1962, ending an industry that had been a sector of the city's economy since 1812, and a direct result of reduced waterfront activity. With deindustrialization, and the nationwide trend of suburbanization; the city's economy began to deteriorate. Like much of the Rust Belt, Buffalo, home to more than half a million people in the 1950s, has seen its population decline as heavy industries shut down and people left for the suburbs or other cities.

Like most former industrial cities of the Great Lakes region in the United States, Buffalo is recovering from an economic depression from suburbanization and the loss of its industrial base. The city's population peaked in 1950 when it was the 15th largest city in the United States, down from the 8th largest city in America in 1900, and its population has been spreading out to the suburbs every census since then. In 2010, Buffalo had a population of 261,310 and an estimated 255,284 inhabitants in 2019. The city's median household income was $24,536 and the median family income was $30,614 in 2010. Males had a median income of $30,938 versus $23,982 for females. The city's per capita income was $14,991. Of the population, 26.6% of individuals and 23% of families, were below the poverty line. Of the total population, 38.4% of those under 18 and 14% of those over 65 were living below the poverty line. The U.S. Census Bureau determined the median household income in 2018 was $35,893 and the per capita income was $23,297. Of the population, 30.3% lived at or below the poverty line in 2018.

Common to many U.S. cities from the 1950s to the 1990s, Buffalo has become a diverse city. The city's diversification is due in part to white flight, the Great Migration, and immigration. Since 2015, Buffalo has become a majority-minority city primarily dominated by African Americans and Hispanic or Latin Americans.

At the American Community Survey's 2018 estimates, 42.5% of the population was non-Hispanic white, 34.3% African American, 0.3% American Indian or Alaska Native, 6.5% Asian, 0.1% from some other race and 3.3% from two or more races. Approximately 13% of Buffalonians were of Hispanic or Latin American origin. The largest Latin American groups in 2018 were Puerto Ricans (9.7%), Mexicans (0.7%), and Cubans (0.3%). Since 2003, there has been an ever-growing number of Burmese refugees, mostly of the Karen ethnicity, with an estimated 4,665 residing in Buffalo as of 2016. In 2018, 10% of the population were foreign-born. At the 2010 census, the city's population was 50.4% white (45.8% non-Hispanic white), 38.6% black or African-American, 0.8% American Indian and Alaska Native, 3.2% Asian, 3.9% from some other race and 3.1% from two or more races, while 10.5% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Per Sperling's BestPlaces in 2020, nearly 60% of Buffalonians identify with a religion. Overall, Buffalo and Upstate New York are more religious than Downstate New York.

Largely a result of British and French colonialism and missionary work, Christianity is the largest religion in Buffalo and Western New York. The largest Christian groups in Buffalo and the surrounding area are the Catholic Church (38.8%) and Baptists (2.9%). Buffalo's Catholic population primarily make up the Latin Church's Diocese of Buffalo. The Catholic Diocese of Buffalo covers Western New York except for the nearby Diocese of Rochester. Its episcopal see is St. Joseph Cathedral. Baptists in the city mainly affiliate with the American Baptist Churches USA,National Baptist Convention, USA and the National Baptist Convention of America. There is one Cooperative Baptist church within the metropolitan area as of 2020. The third largest Christian group in the city are Lutherans (2.7%), primarily served by the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.

Methodists (2.0%), Presbyterians (1.9%) and Pentecostals (1.2%) were the following largest Christian groups. The Methodist and Presbyterian Buffalonian communities are dominated by the United Methodist Church and Presbyterian Church (USA). Pentecostals are generally affiliated with the Assemblies of God USA and Church of God in Christ.

Nearly 1% of local Christians identified as Anglican or Episcopalian. Most align themselves with the Diocese of Western New York of the Episcopal Church in the U.S. Its cathedral is St. Paul's Cathedral. The remainder are affiliated with Continuing Anglican or Evangelical Episcopal denominations. There are two Anglican Church in North America-affiliated churches further east in the Rochester metropolitan area.

Approximately 0.3% professed Mormonism and 3.3% were of another Christian faith including the Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox churches, non-denominational Protestants, and others. The largest Eastern Orthodox jurisdictions are the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America (Ecumenical Patriarchate) and Diocese of New York and New Jersey (Orthodox Church in America).

Islam is Buffalo's second largest religion (1.8%). Sunni Islam is the predominant branch practiced. Most Sunni mosques are members of the Islamic Society of North America. The Nation of Islam has one mosque in Buffalo.

Judaism made up the third largest religion in the area (0.9%). As of 2020, Orthodox, Conservative, and Reform Judaism were the most prevalent groups affiliated with throughout Buffalo and the surrounding area. A little over 0.5% professed an eastern faith including Buddhism, Hinduism, and Sikhism.

The remainder of Buffalo and the surrounding area was spiritual but not religious, agnostic, deistic or atheist, though some Buffalonians identified with contemporary pagan religions including Wicca, Nature religion and other smaller new religious movements. Many contemporary pagans, spiritual but not religious and New Age residents attend the city's Winter Solstice celebrations annually. They are also participants of the Western New York Pagan Pride celebrations.

About New York

New York is a city that is divided into five boroughs namely, Manhattan, Queens, Brooklyn, The Bronx and Staten Island. These are some of the most densely populated cities in the United States of America. Each borough of New York is responsible for maintaining and preserving its own historical legacies. Demographics of New York City provide interesting details about the history and development of this city.

New York City comprises five boroughs sitting beside the Hudson River, which is its primary bay. In its center is Manhattan, a highly populated borough which is among the world's major commercial, financial and political centers. Its iconic sites are skyscrapers like the Empire State Building and wide sweeping Central Park. Broadway shows off the best of Broadway with musicals and plays showcasing all the best aspects of human life. Movie lovers can view all their favorite movies along with great shows in movie theaters at New York's Times Square and Hollywood.

But New York's crowning glory is its cultural diversity. It has an amazing assortment of neighborhoods that showcase every facet of New York City. From the very hip East Village to the quiet neighborhoods of Ridgeway and Williamsburg, the cultural diversity of New York City is simply mind blowing. Some of the most famous neighborhoods of New York City are Chinatown, Little Italy, Soho, and Greenwich Village.

If you're looking for a cheaper place to live, then New York City might not be your first choice. However, if you look hard enough, you will find some wonderful places in New York City that are affordable. One of the areas that has recently been booming with development is the Lower Cost Housing Units. The Brooklyn Bridge Park has brought a lot of attention to this part of Brooklyn, as well as other Brooklyn housing developments such as Jay Street and Williamsburg. With a lot of new loft conversions and new home starts, the neighborhoods in Brooklyn have really just started to pop up.

There are also five boroughs of New York City: Manhattan, Bronx, Queens, Brooklyn and Staten Island. The boroughs each have their own unique style, and some of the most popular neighborhoods of New York City include Manhattan, Bronx, Queens, and Brooklyn. Each borough has a unique style, but a common thing that every borough shares is a very diverse climate.

The weather in New York City can be compared to the great deserts of the Middle East. You can expect to get hot in the summer and cold in the winter. If you are looking to experience New York to the fullest, then head out to the five boroughs of New York City. This will give you a complete tour of the entire city. If you live in New York, you can take a New York tour bus and soak in the culture of this interesting place.

Living in Brooklyn is quite unique. The rich cultural life of this borough is highlighted by its multi-cultural neighborhoods. Many of the neighborhoods in Brooklyn boast a brownstone's lifestyle, while others have hip condos and apartments with white picket fences. If you are looking for a comfortable place to raise a family, a one-bedroom apartment in a hip neighborhood of Brooklyn is for you.

If you are looking for a more cultural experience in New York, head out to the southern tip of the island. Here, you can enjoy the hip culture of the hip hop scene and shopping at its best. On the west side of the island, you can enjoy the beautiful waterfronts of New York. The best thing about the west side of New York is that it has little to do with the city's downtown subway system. You can enjoy a nice lunch on your balcony or walk down to the ferry to go downtown. So, if you are looking for a place with a little bit more cultural experience, make your way to the Brooklyn New York state.

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