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We’re a team of twenty-three web, digital marketing, SEO, and operations professionals. Heaviside Group was founded in 2011 as a side project and has continued to grow and expand year after year.

Our group is divided into four internal teams: Web, Digital Marketing, SEO, and Operations. Each team has specialists in those disciplines, and they work together to deliver projects accurately and on-time. Everything is managed by our operations team, which provides sales, customer service, and project management support to our clients.

In 2017, we launched our Heaviside Digital platform, designed to provide high-quality web, digital marketing, and SEO services to businesses with lower marketing budgets.

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Web Design – Basic
4.9
(42)
$750.00

Basic custom-designed website, up to four pages

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Web Design – Standard
4.9
(42)
$1,495.00

E-commerce custom-designed website, up to 10 pages

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Web Design – Premium
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$2,495.00

Advanced custom-designed website, up to 15 pages

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REVIEWS

tinabeezy
tinabeezy
5/5

I have a podcast and this is the first team that was able to provide what I needed to have a pretty and functional website. This was the best experience with a web designer/developer!! They were communicative, they were prompt, they were courteous, professional, and much more. I have two other businesses and will DEFINITELY use them again.

10 months ago
nrtbk2015
nrtbk2015
5/5

Despite a LOT of hiccups on my end, they pushed through and got exactly what I needed done. Very patient and great communication.

10 months ago
robcookkc
robcookkc
5/5

Great job!

11 months ago
timelessmedia
timelessmedia
5/5

They did a fabulous job, but it took longer than planned.

11 months ago
errolx1
errolx1
3/5

Working with Heavyside felt like that the design of the website is done by the customer and Heavyside will convert to WordPress and migrate to the internet

11 months ago

About Service

If you are looking to hire a web design company for your new website, there are some important questions you must ask first. There are three main elements involved when hiring a web design company, the first being what exactly you need your website to accomplish. The next is what type of experience does each of the companies you are investigating have, and the final question you must ask yourself is how much money will you be willing to spend on their services. By answering these three questions ahead of time, you can narrow down your search and make sure that the web design company you eventually choose will fit into your business plan.

Web design business. A web design company consists of four different departments: Design department deals with all the graphic designs and graphics on the websites. Web Development is responsible for all programming the website, both the coding and the style. Marketing Department handles any analysis that might be necessary, business goals, and content.

It is very important to hire a professional website designer or developer who has years of experience. A simple website does not mean a professional website. While most web design companies offer basic website design packages for purchase, they usually charge more for professional website design. Web development usually consists of building and maintaining a basic website with many features that can be customized. Web designers and developers are very creative and can create a very nice looking simple website that has all the features you are looking for.

There are many different tools that are available to help with designing your website. There are many different types of programs that allow you to set up a simple website, and there are many different tools that help you manage all of the information on your site. You can choose whether to have an online store, or if you want your customers to be able to order from your home page. This all depends on how much you want to customize your site, and what features you think will benefit your company the most.

Some of the top website designers and developers use flash, HTML, JavaScript, and many other tools that make it very easy for web designers and developers to get a very professional website up and running in very little time. There are many different features that you can add to a simple website. You can change the color scheme, change the fonts, change the borders, and many other features. Most web designers and developers use a lot of flash based features to make the web pages very interactive and appealing. You will find that there are many different things that you can do with the code that is built into your website.

Many website designers and developers use professional website designs and web development companies to get their sites looking exactly how they want. The professional web designers can create a website layout or design that will work exactly the way that you want it too. You should be sure that you hire a web development company that uses high quality web design principles.

Web Design Company Kansas City, Missouri

ABOUT Kansas City

Kansas City, Missouri, was incorporated as a town on June 1, 1850, and as a city on March 28, 1853. The territory, straddling the border between Missouri and Kansas at the confluence of the Kansas and Missouri rivers, was considered a good place to build settlements.

The Antioch Christian Church, Dr. James Compton House, and Woodneath are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The first documented European visitor to the eventual site of Kansas City was Étienne de Veniard, Sieur de Bourgmont, who was also the first European to explore the lower Missouri River. Criticized for his response to the Native American attack on Fort Détroit, he had deserted his post as fort commander and was avoiding French authorities. Bourgmont lived with a Native American wife in a village about 90 miles (140 km) east near Brunswick, Missouri, where he illegally traded furs.

To clear his name, he wrote Exact Description of Louisiana, of Its Harbors, Lands and Rivers, and Names of the Indian Tribes That Occupy It, and the Commerce and Advantages to Be Derived Therefrom for the Establishment of a Colony in 1713 followed in 1714 by The Route to Be Taken to Ascend the Missouri River. In the documents, he describes the junction of the "Grande Riv[ière] des Cansez" and Missouri River, making him the first to adopt those names. French cartographer Guillaume Delisle used the descriptions to make the area's first reasonably accurate map.

The Spanish took over the region in the Treaty of Paris in 1763, but were not to play a major role other than taxing and licensing Missouri River ship traffic. The French continued their fur trade under Spanish license. The Chouteau family operated under Spanish license at St. Louis, in the lower Missouri Valley as early as 1765 and in 1821 the Chouteaus reached Kansas City, where François Chouteau established Chouteau's Landing.

After the 1804 Louisiana Purchase, Lewis and Clark visited the confluence of the Kansas and Missouri rivers, noting it was a good place to build a fort. In 1831, a group of Mormons from New York settled in what would become the city. They built the first school within Kansas City's current boundaries, but were forced out by mob violence in 1833, and their settlement remained vacant.

In 1833 John McCoy, son of Baptist missionary Isaac McCoy, established West Port along the Santa Fe Trail, 3 miles (4.8 kilometers) away from the river. In 1834 McCoy established Westport Landing on a bend in the Missouri to serve as a landing point for West Port. Soon after, the Kansas Town Company, a group of investors, began to settle the area, taking their name from an English spelling of "Cansez." The 1837 Great Plains smallpox epidemic, which began when a ship carrying an infected person landed at Fort Leavenworth, a short distance to the north, devastated Plains Indian villages along the Missouri River, while white settlements were still sparse.

In 1850, the landing area was incorporated as the Town of Kansas. By that time, the Town of Kansas, Westport, and nearby Independence, had become critical points in the westward expansion of the United States. Three major trails – the Santa Fe, California, and Oregon – all passed through Jackson County.

On February 22, 1853, the City of Kansas was created with a newly elected mayor. It had an area of 0.70 square miles (1.8 km2) and a population of 2,500. The boundary lines at that time extended from the middle of the Missouri River south to what is now Ninth Street, and from Bluff Street on the west to a point between Holmes Road and Charlotte Street on the east.

During the Civil War, the city and its immediate surroundings were the focus of intense military activity. Although the First Battle of Independence in August 1862 resulted in a Confederate States Army victory, the Confederates were unable to leverage their win in any significant fashion, as Kansas City was occupied by Union troops and proved too heavily fortified to assault. The Second Battle of Independence, which occurred on October 21–22, 1864, as part of Sterling Price's Missouri expedition of 1864, also resulted in a Confederate triumph. Once again their victory proved hollow, as Price was decisively defeated in the pivotal Battle of Westport the next day, effectively ending Confederate efforts to regain Missouri.

General Thomas Ewing, in response to a successful raid on nearby Lawrence, Kansas, led by William Quantrill, issued General Order No. 11, forcing the eviction of residents in four western Missouri counties – including Jackson – except those living in the city and nearby communities and those whose allegiance to the Union was certified by Ewing.

After the Civil War, Kansas City grew rapidly, largely losing its Southern identity. The selection of the city over Leavenworth, Kansas, for the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad bridge over the Missouri River brought about significant growth. The population exploded after 1869, when the Hannibal Bridge, designed by Octave Chanute, opened. The boom prompted a name change to Kansas City in 1889, and the city limits to be extended south and east. Westport became part of Kansas City on December 2, 1897. In 1900, Kansas City was the 22nd largest city in the country, with a population of 163,752 residents.

Kansas City, guided by architect George Kessler, became a forefront example of the City Beautiful movement, offering a network of boulevards and parks. New neighborhoods, like Southmoreland and the Rockhill District were conceived to accommodate the city’s largest residencies of palatial proportions.

The relocation of Union Station to its current location in 1914 and the opening of the Liberty Memorial in 1923 provided two of the city's most identifiable landmarks. Robert A. Long, president of the Liberty Memorial Association, was a driving force in the funding for construction. Long was a longtime resident and wealthy businessman. He built the R.A. Long Building for the Long-Bell Lumber Company, his home, Corinthian Hall (now the Kansas City Museum) and Longview Farm.

Further spurring Kansas City's growth was the opening of the innovative Country Club Plaza development by J.C. Nichols in 1925, as part of his Country Club District plan.

The Kansas City streetcar system once had hundreds of miles of streetcars running through the city and was one of the largest systems in the country. In 1903 the 8th Street Tunnel was built as an underground streetcar system through the city. The last run of the streetcar was on June 23, 1957 but the tunnel still exists.

At the start of the 20th century, political machines gained clout in the city, with the one led by Tom Pendergast dominating the city by 1925. Several important buildings and structures were built during this time, including the Kansas City City Hall and the Jackson County Courthouse. The machine fell in 1939 when Pendergast, riddled with health problems, pleaded guilty to tax evasion after long federal investigations. His biographers have summed up Pendergast's uniqueness:

Kansas City's suburban development began with a streetcar system in the early decades of the 20th century. The city's first suburbs were in the neighborhoods of Pendleton Heights and Quality Hill. After World War II, many relatively affluent residents left for suburbs in Johnson County, Kansas, and eastern Jackson County, Missouri. Many also went north of the Missouri River, where Kansas City had incorporated areas between the 1940s and 1970s.

Troost Avenue, once the eastern edge of Kansas City, Mo. and a residential corridor nicknamed Millionaire Row, is now widely seen as one of the city's most prominent racial and economic dividing lines due to urban decay, which was caused by white flight. During the civil rights era the city blocked people of color from moving to homes west of Troost Avenue, causing the areas east of Troost to have one of the worst murder rates in the country. This led to the dominating economic success of the neighboring Johnson County.

In 1950, African Americans represented 12.2% of Kansas City's population. The sprawling characteristics of the city and its environs today mainly took shape after 1960s race riots. The April 1968 assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. was a catalyst for the 1968 Kansas City riot. At this time, slums were forming in the inner city, and many who could afford to do so left for the suburbs and outer edges of the city. The post-World War II idea of suburbs and the "American Dream" also contributed to the sprawl of the area. The city's population continued to grow, but the inner city declined. The city's most populous ethnic group, non-Hispanic whites, declined from 89.5% in 1930 to 54.9% in 2010.

In 1940, the city had about 400,000 residents; by 2000, it was home to only about 180,000. From 1940 to 1960, the city more than doubled its physical size, while increasing its population by only about 75,000. By 1970, the city covered approximately 316 square miles (820 km2), more than five times its size in 1940.

The Hyatt Regency walkway collapse was a major disaster that occurred on July 17, 1981, killing 114 people and injuring more than 200 others during a tea dance in the 45-story Hyatt Regency hotel in Crown Center. It is the deadliest structural collapse in US history other than the September 11 attacks. In 2015 a memorial called the Skywalk Memorial Plaza was built for the families of the victims of the disaster, across the street from the hotel which is now a Sheraton.

In the 21st century, the Kansas City area has undergone extensive redevelopment, with more than $6 billion in improvements to the downtown area on the Missouri side. One of the main goals is to attract convention and tourist dollars, office workers, and residents to downtown KCMO. Among the projects include the redevelopment of the Power & Light District, located in the area to the east of the Power & Light Building (the former headquarters of the Kansas City Power & Light Company, which is now based in the district's northern end), into a retail and entertainment district; and the Sprint Center, an 18,500-seat arena that opened in 2007, funded by a 2004 ballot initiative involving a tax on car rentals and hotels, designed to meet the stadium specifications for a possible future NBA or NHL franchise, and was renamed T-Mobile Center in 2020; Kemper Arena, which was replaced by Sprint Center, fell into disrepair and was sold to private developers. By 2018, the arena was being converted to a sports complex under the name Hy-Vee Arena. The Kauffman Performing Arts Center opened in 2011 providing a new, modern home to the KC Orchestra and Ballet. In 2015, an 800-room Hyatt Convention Center Hotel was announced for a site next to the Performance Arts Center & Bartle Hall. Construction was scheduled to start in early 2018 with Loews as the operator.

From 2007 to 2017, downtown residential population in Kansas City quadrupled and continues to grow. The area has grown from almost 4,000 residents in the early 2000s to nearly 30,000 as of 2017. Kansas City's downtown ranks as the 6th-fastest-growing downtown in America with the population expected to grow by more than 40% by 2022. Conversions of office buildings such as the Power & Light Building and the Commerce Bank Tower into residential and hotel space has helped to fulfill the demand. New apartment complexes like One, Two, and Three Lights, River Market West, and 503 Main have begun to reshape Kansas City's skyline. Strong demand has led to occupancy rates in the upper 90%.

While the residential population of downtown has boomed, the office population has dropped significantly from the early 2000s to the mid 2010s. AMC and other top employers moved their operations to modern office buildings in the suburbs. High office vacancy plagued downtown, leading to the neglect of many office buildings. By the mid 2010s, many office buildings were converted to residential uses and the Class A vacancy rate plunged to 12% in 2017. Swiss Re, Virgin Mobile, AutoAlert, and others have begun to move operations to downtown Kansas City from the suburbs as well as expensive coastal cities.

The area has seen additional development through various transportation projects, including improvements to the Grandview Triangle, which intersects Interstates 435 and 470, and U.S. Route 71, a thoroughfare long notorious for fatal accidents.

In July 2005, the Kansas City Area Transportation Authority (KCATA) launched Kansas City's first bus rapid transit line, the Metro Area Express (MAX), which links the River Market, Downtown, Union Station, Crown Center and the Country Club Plaza. The KCATA continues to expand MAX with additional routes on Prospect Avenue, Troost Avenue, and Independence Avenue.

In 2013, construction began on a two-mile streetcar line in downtown Kansas City (funded by a $102 million ballot initiative that was passed in 2012) that runs between the River Market and Union Station, it began operation in May 2016. In 2017, voters approved the formation of a TDD to expand the streetcar line south 3.5 miles from Union Station to UMKC's Volker Campus. Additionally in 2017, the KC Port Authority began engineering studies for a Port Authority funded streetcar expansion north to Berkley Riverfront Park. Citywide, voter support for rail projects continues to grow with numerous light rail projects in the works.

In 2016, Jackson County, Missouri, acquired unused rail lines as part of a long-term commuter rail plan. For the time being, the line is being converted to a trail while county officials negotiate with railroads for access to tracks in Downtown Kansas City.

On November 7, 2017, Kansas City, Missouri, voters overwhelmingly approved a new single terminal at Kansas City International Airport by a 75% to 25% margin. The new single terminal will replace the three existing "Clover Leafs" at KCI Airport and is expected to open in October 2022.

According to the 2010 census, the racial composition of Kansas City was as follows:

Kansas City has the second largest Somali and Sudanese populations in the United States. The Latino/Hispanic population of Kansas City, which is heavily Mexican and Central American, is spread throughout the metropolitan area, with some concentration in the northeast part of the city and southwest of downtown. The Asian population, mostly Southeast Asian, is partly concentrated within the northeast side to the Columbus Park neighborhood in the Greater Downtown area, a historically Italian American neighborhood, the UMKC area and in River Market, in northern Kansas City.

The Historic Kansas City boundary is roughly 58 square miles (150 km2) and has a population density of about 5,000 people per sq. mi. It runs from the Missouri River to the north, 79th Street to the south, the Blue River to the east, and State Line Road to the west. During the 1960s and 1970s, Kansas City annexed large amounts of land, which are largely undeveloped to this day.

Between the 2000 and 2010 Census counts, the urban core of Kansas City continued to drop significantly in population. The areas of Greater Downtown in the center city, and sections near I-435 and I-470 in the south, and Highway 152 in the north are the only areas of Kansas City, Missouri, to have seen an increase in population, with the Northland seeing the greatest population growth. Even so, the population of Kansas City as a whole from 2000 to 2010 increased by 4.1%.

Current or former long-time residents include these: cartoonists Walt Disney, Friz Freleng, and Ub Iwerks; musicians Count Basie, Melissa Etheridge, Eminem, and Tech N9ne; politicians Emanuel Cleaver and Tom Pendergast; actors Don Cheadle, Rob Riggle, Paul Rudd, and Jason Sudeikis; reporter Walter Cronkite; pilot Amelia Earhart; and writer Ernest Hemingway.

About Kansas

Kansas is the home of some of the most famous names in American history, including Heman Ely, Attanasia Hanks, Lawrence Wethington, Atta Mills and many more. Kansas City is where many of the "Greatest Names in History" were born, like Sam Langhorne Clemens, Atta Mills, Lawrence Lasker and the aforementioned individuals. Kansas has also been a destination for musical artists, including Jelly Belly, Percy Sledge and Aretha Franklin. Kansas City has played a crucial role in shaping the country's culture and today, Kansas City is again, making it a hot destination for immigrants to the country.

The state of Kansas has been described as a place filled with excitement since the early days of the nation. Its territory stretched from the western portions of Texas into present-day northern Louisiana. This "American West" region was a center of growth for both fur traders with their African horses. It was also a major trading post in the Heartland during the 1800s. When the nation was experiencing a "grain depression," Kansas was one of the few states that prospered, thanks in large part to the abundance of fertile land, paired with an excellent climate and the ability to railroads through much of the state.

Kansas had been a center for one of the biggest and most important trade disputes in modern history. At the time, Kansas was the very heart of the transcontinental railroad and, later, the state's biggest market for grain. Kansas became a pro-slavery state when the Kansas territory was split among slave-holding Missouri settlers and free states. Kansas was the final destination for both free blacks and white slave-holding Missourians in the United States' vast slave-holding south.

The pro-slavery element in Kansas was a significant one. Kansas was under the thumb of a man named Aaron Henry Powlegs. He organized and led what was known as the "Kansas Free State Party" and was instrumental in getting Kansas into the union. This group was considered a dangerous fringe by many of its Southerners and other people in the north. The Kansas Free State Party later splintered and was absorbed into the larger anti-slavery movement.

Kansas was also the home of some of the nation's biggest popular comedians. Kansas City has been the home of Dick Gregory, Larry the Cable Guy, and several other notable comedians who have made a name for themselves in Kansas City. In fact, Kansas City is the home of the "Kansas City Chainsaw Massacre" where a dispute between citizens resulted in a horrific killing. Bill Kansas was the Kansas Governor at the time, and he ordered the execution of the victims because they were African-Americans.

Basketball was a big part of Kansas during the early years. Kansas was one of the first colleges to offer professional basketball programs. A lot of good basketball players have come out of Kansas including Clyde Drexler, Scottie Pippen and Bruce Maxwell. They are just a few of the many that have gone on to become professional basketball players all over the world.

The University of Kentucky has also held the title of "Famous Five." This was back in 1960. These included such notables as John Wooden, George Mason, Oscar Robertson, and John Ringo. The "Famous Five" is still popular today as a fun class to take in college.

As you can see, Kentucky is both a world-famous place in which to live and also a popular place for entertainment. You can find a variety of events taking place in Kansas City throughout the year. From the large annual Jazz Fest in January to the amateur basketball leagues throughout the summer, Kansas City is an interesting and vibrant place to visit.

About Missouri

Missouri is a state located in the eastern Midwestern section of the United States, bordering Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska and southern Kansas. With over six million residents, it's the ninth-most densely populated state of the nation. The capital, Jefferson City, is its largest city. The state is today the twenty-second-largest in area covered by population.

Missouri has much to offer the visitor interested in outdoor activities. It offers mountains, rivers, forests, preserves and other natural areas for recreation. Wildlife is especially abundant in Missouri. Wolves, coyotes, foxes, bobcats, bears, eagles, deer and many migratory birds call Missouri home. There are opportunities for fishing, hunting, camping and hiking. Bulldog breeders also find a good market in Missouri.

History buffs will discover that Missouri has a long and colorful history, especially along the Mississippi River. Missouri became a major railroad connection between Chicago and St. Louis. The "American Railroad" left its tracks in Independence Hall Park across the street from the park. In the early twentieth century, the Great Depression gave rise to urban renewal and development in major cities like St. Louis. The city added two major bridges and major roadways, like what we see today along the river. Missouri even hosted the first major international automobile event in the world when the Ford Motor Company's Dearborn car rolled off the assembly line in Missouri.

Demography is one of the most important factors in deciding where to locate a family in Missouri. Like the rest of the United States, Missouri is aging. The national average in median age is thirty-six years old. This is well above the national average of 28 years old. As the population ages, Missouri will likely continue to grow more populated. The number of people of childbearing age is also on the rise in this fast-growing country.

Missouri does have many native populations that have moved from other states or who have moved to this state in recent times. These include African-Americans, who make up about twenty-two percent of the Missouri population, and Hispanic immigrants, who comprise another twenty-four percent. The countrywide trend of migration may contribute to the increase in the population of Missouri. Some people move from nearby states to settle down in Missouri because it offers both good jobs and proximity to their home state. Others move from other countries to reach Missouri, which has an economy that is highly dependent on trade with other countries. And finally, some people choose to leave their current location for better employment prospects in Missouri.

The overall demographics of Missouri will continue to change as people continue to migrate to and from this state. Some areas of Missouri seem to be gaining residents at a faster rate than others. These include the cities of St. Louis and Missouri City, where there are already several growing populations. Other areas, like Rolla and Columbia, seem to have more turnover than others.

The primary reason that migration occurs is often because of the changing economic landscape within the community in which people reside. As business grows, employment opportunities open up, and property values rise, the rates of residence among certain groups tend to change. Demography and local culture both play a role in the way people move from place to place.

Because migration can be a very natural process, demography and its effects on a state's population can be easily tracked. There are even tools available online that allow anyone to look at a particular county in Missouri and see what kind of population it has. This is helpful when studying the migration trends of a specific ethnic group, like the Black population or the Native American population. Demographics can provide important clues about how a town or city will fit into its surrounding area or what kind of economic growth it might experience in the future.