Looking for a Facebook Ads Agency?

We’re a team of twenty-three web, digital marketing, SEO, and operations professionals. Heaviside Group was founded in 2011 as a side project and has continued to grow and expand year after year.

Our group is divided into four internal teams: Web, Digital Marketing, SEO, and Operations. Each team has specialists in those disciplines, and they work together to deliver projects accurately and on-time. Everything is managed by our operations team, which provides sales, customer service, and project management support to our clients.

In 2017, we launched our Heaviside Digital platform, designed to provide high-quality web, digital marketing, and SEO services to businesses with lower marketing budgets.

SERVICES

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Facebook Ads – Consultation
$125.00
Up to one-hour phone consultation, with screen share if needed. Troubleshoot, audit, review, etc. Audit may reduce live call time.
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Facebook Ads – Basic
4.9
(75)
$300.00 / month
We will build your Facebook Ads campaign and manage spend up to $500 per month.
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Facebook Ads – Standard
4.8
(76)
$450.00 / month
We will build your Facebook Ads campaign and manage spend up to $1,000 per month.
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Facebook Ads – Premium
4.9
(75)
$795.00 / month
We will build your Facebook Ads campaign and manage spend up to $4,000 per month.
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REVIEWS

jeffersonlew232
jeffersonlew232
5/5

You did an amazing job

2 years ago
driftersldn
driftersldn
5/5

Really diligent and patient, thank you so much!

2 years ago
socialdesigners
socialdesigners
5/5

Another month with heavisidegroup and I'm very happy with their work!

2 years ago
jacksum
jacksum
5/5

They did manage the ad campaign on fb as promised .... although we didn’t see any sales they did do their part in running the ads and managing them as promised .

2 years ago
milcaguadalupe
milcaguadalupe
5/5

It was a very good experience. I appreciate their patience and hard work.

2 years ago

About Service

A Facebook Ads Agency basically handles Facebook marketing campaigns for the clients. These days, there has never been a greater time to begin a new business online than right now. One of today's most popular lifestyle companies you could develop from nothing is a Facebook marketing agency. With the huge number of potential customers on Facebook, it's vital to constantly drive qualified traffic to one's business website. A Facebook campaign can also be used to generate lead generation which can be extremely profitable.

When it comes to creating Facebook ads campaigns, it's important to stay as generic as possible. Don't give away too much information about your company's specific product or service up front. Targeting specific demographics is ideal and by targeting specific markets you'll easily be able to increase your customer base. A Facebook ads agency has the expertise to create ad campaigns that are completely tailored to each and every client. They know how to effectively target demographics and create an ad campaign that will deliver results.

Targeting specific markets is essential because this way you'll be more likely to retain those customers. Remember, a person who isn't interested in your product is likely not going to click on your ad. However, they could still be on your mailing list. Using the data from your Facebook ads clients, the ad marketers will create ads that will target the people who want what you have to offer, and you'll increase your sales!

It's not hard to generate leads with a Facebook ads agency either. By targeting your ads based on keywords, location, gender, age or any other form of demographic you'll quickly get clients clicking through to your website. It's that simple and effective. So you don't need to spend hours posting messages on social media sites when you could be generating leads on autopilot with a great advertising agency and web marketing tool.

Don't believe that the sky is the limit with advertising online. There are so many businesses trying to market online that it can be difficult to find quality leads that actually want to buy something. But you won't have to spend all day posting messages on social networking sites trying to drum up business as you can let a professional advertising agency to do that for you. The real money is in quality campaigns that target people who are actually looking for what you have to offer. It's much easier to sell to the masses than it is to sell to a group of individuals who are already halfway vested.

Once you've got quality leads, your next step is to convert them into sales. That's where retargeting ad campaigns come in. These campaigns allow you to target people already interested in what you have to offer but who are not ready to make a purchase just yet. With retargeting campaigns you simply need to send them a message asking them if they are ready to take that next step and give you their name, email, phone number, and the URL where they can find more information about your products and services. You can then follow up with a second message asking them if they still want to take the action you requested of them. By doing this you're increasing your chances of converting those leads into actual sales, which will increase your chances of making more money from Facebook ads.

ABOUT Columbia

Columbia's origins begin with the settlement of American pioneers from Kentucky and Virginia in an early 1800s region known as the Boonslick. Before 1815 settlement in the region was confined to small log forts due to the threat of Native American attack during the War of 1812. When the war ended settlers came on foot, horseback, and wagon, often moving entire households along the Boone's Lick Road and sometimes bringing enslaved African Americans. By 1818 it was clear that the increased population would necessitate a new county be created from territorial Howard County. The Moniteau Creek on the west and Cedar Creek on the east were obvious natural boundaries.

Believing it was only a matter of time before a county seat was chosen, the Smithton Land Company was formed to purchase over 2,000 acres (8.1 km2) to establish the village of Smithton (which is located near the present-day intersection of Walnut and Garth). In 1819 Smithton was a small cluster of log cabins in an ancient forest of oak and hickory; chief among them was the cabin of Richard Gentry, a trustee of the Smithton Company who would become first mayor of Columbia. In 1820, Boone County was formed and named after the recently deceased explorer Daniel Boone. The Missouri Legislature appointed John Gray, Jefferson Fulcher, Absalom Hicks, Lawrence Bass, and David Jackson as commissioners to select and establish a permanent county seat. Smithton never had more than twenty people, and it was quickly realized that well digging was difficult because of the bedrock.

Springs were discovered across the Flat Branch Creek, so in the spring of 1821 Columbia was laid out, and the inhabitants of Smithton moved their cabins to the new town. The first house in Columbia was built by Thomas Duly in 1820 at what became Fifth and Broadway. Columbia's permanence was ensured when it was chosen as county seat in 1821 and the Boone's Lick Road was rerouted down Broadway.

The roots of Columbia's three economic foundations—education, medicine, and insurance— can be traced to the city's incorporation in 1821. Original plans for the town set aside land for a state university. In 1833, Columbia Baptist Female College opened, which later became Stephens College. Columbia College, distinct from today's and later to become the University of Missouri, was founded in 1839. When the state legislature decided to establish a state university, Columbia raised three times as much money as any competing city, and James S. Rollins donated the land that is today the Francis Quadrangle. Soon other educational institutions were founded in Columbia, such as Christian Female College, the first college for women west of the Mississippi, which later became Columbia College.

The city benefited from being a stagecoach stop of the Santa Fe and Oregon trails, and later from the Missouri–Kansas–Texas Railroad. In 1822, William Jewell set up the first hospital. In 1830, the first newspaper began; in 1832, the first theater in the state was opened; and in 1835, the state's first agricultural fair was held. By 1839, the population of 13,000 and wealth of Boone County was exceeded in Missouri only by that of St. Louis County, which, at that time, included the City of St. Louis.

Columbia's infrastructure was relatively untouched by the Civil War. As a slave state, Missouri had many residents with Southern sympathies, but it stayed in the Union. The majority of the city was pro-Union; however, the surrounding agricultural areas of Boone County and the rest of central Missouri were decidedly pro-Confederate. Because of this, the University of Missouri became a base from which Union troops operated. No battles were fought within the city because the presence of Union troops dissuaded Confederate guerrillas from attacking, though several major battles occurred at nearby Boonville and Centralia.

After Reconstruction, race relations in Columbia followed the Southern pattern of increasing violence of whites against blacks in efforts to suppress voting and free movement: George Burke, a black man who worked at the university, was lynched in 1889. In the spring of 1923, James T. Scott, an African-American janitor at the University of Missouri, was arrested on allegations of raping a university professor's daughter. He was taken from the county jail and lynched on April 29 before a white mob of several hundred, hanged from the Old Stewart Road Bridge.

In the 21st century, a number of efforts have been undertaken to recognize Scott's death. In 2010 his death certificate was changed to reflect that he was never tried or convicted of charges, and that he had been lynched. In 2011 a headstone was put at his grave at Columbia Cemetery; it includes his wife's and parents' names and dates, to provide a fuller account of his life. In 2016, a marker was erected at the lynching site to memorialize Scott.

In 1963, University of Missouri System and the Columbia College system established their headquarters in Columbia. The insurance industry also became important to the local economy as several companies established headquarters in Columbia, including Shelter Insurance, Missouri Employers Mutual, and Columbia Insurance Group. State Farm Insurance has a regional office in Columbia. In addition, the now-defunct Silvey Insurance was a large local employer.

Columbia became a transportation crossroads when U.S. Route 63 and U.S. Route 40 (which was improved as present-day Interstate 70) were routed through the city. Soon after, the city opened the Columbia Regional Airport. By 2000, the city's population was nearly 85,000.

In 2017, Columbia was in the path of totality for the Solar eclipse of August 21, 2017. The city was expecting upwards of 400,000 tourists coming to view the eclipse.

As of the census of 2010, 108,500 people, 43,065 households, and 21,418 families resided in the city. The population density was 1,720.0 inhabitants per square mile (664.1/km2). There were 46,758 housing units at an average density of 741.2 per square mile (286.2/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 79.0% White, 11.3% African American, 0.3% Native American, 5.2% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 1.1% from other races, and 3.1% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.4% of the population.

There were 43,065 households, of which 26.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 35.6% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.5% had a male householder with no wife present, and 50.3% were non-families. 32.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the city the population was spread out, with 18.8% of residents under the age of 18; 27.3% between the ages of 18 and 24; 26.7% from 25 to 44; 18.6% from 45 to 64; and 8.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age in the city was 26.8 years. The gender makeup of the city was 48.3% male and 51.7% female.

As of the census of 2000, there were 84,531 people, 33,689 households, and 17,282 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,592.8 people per square mile (615.0/km2). There were 35,916 housing units at an average density of 676.8 per square mile (261.3/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 81.54% White, 10.85% Black or African American, 0.39% Native American, 4.30% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.81% from other races, and 2.07% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.05% of the population.

There were 33,689 households, out of which 26.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.2% were married couples living together, 10.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 48.7% were non-families. 33.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size was 2.92.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 19.7% under the age of 18, 26.7% from 18 to 24, 28.7% from 25 to 44, 16.2% from 45 to 64, and 8.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 27 years. For every 100 females, there were 91.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $33,729, and the median income for a family was $52,288. Males had a median income of $34,710 versus $26,694 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,507. About 9.4% of families and 19.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.8% of those under age 18 and 5.2% of those age 65 or over. However, traditional statistics of income and poverty can be misleading when applied to cities with high student populations, such as Columbia.

About Missouri

Missouri is a state located in the eastern Midwestern section of the United States, bordering Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska and southern Kansas. With over six million residents, it's the ninth-most densely populated state of the nation. The capital, Jefferson City, is its largest city. The state is today the twenty-second-largest in area covered by population.

Missouri has much to offer the visitor interested in outdoor activities. It offers mountains, rivers, forests, preserves and other natural areas for recreation. Wildlife is especially abundant in Missouri. Wolves, coyotes, foxes, bobcats, bears, eagles, deer and many migratory birds call Missouri home. There are opportunities for fishing, hunting, camping and hiking. Bulldog breeders also find a good market in Missouri.

History buffs will discover that Missouri has a long and colorful history, especially along the Mississippi River. Missouri became a major railroad connection between Chicago and St. Louis. The "American Railroad" left its tracks in Independence Hall Park across the street from the park. In the early twentieth century, the Great Depression gave rise to urban renewal and development in major cities like St. Louis. The city added two major bridges and major roadways, like what we see today along the river. Missouri even hosted the first major international automobile event in the world when the Ford Motor Company's Dearborn car rolled off the assembly line in Missouri.

Demography is one of the most important factors in deciding where to locate a family in Missouri. Like the rest of the United States, Missouri is aging. The national average in median age is thirty-six years old. This is well above the national average of 28 years old. As the population ages, Missouri will likely continue to grow more populated. The number of people of childbearing age is also on the rise in this fast-growing country.

Missouri does have many native populations that have moved from other states or who have moved to this state in recent times. These include African-Americans, who make up about twenty-two percent of the Missouri population, and Hispanic immigrants, who comprise another twenty-four percent. The countrywide trend of migration may contribute to the increase in the population of Missouri. Some people move from nearby states to settle down in Missouri because it offers both good jobs and proximity to their home state. Others move from other countries to reach Missouri, which has an economy that is highly dependent on trade with other countries. And finally, some people choose to leave their current location for better employment prospects in Missouri.

The overall demographics of Missouri will continue to change as people continue to migrate to and from this state. Some areas of Missouri seem to be gaining residents at a faster rate than others. These include the cities of St. Louis and Missouri City, where there are already several growing populations. Other areas, like Rolla and Columbia, seem to have more turnover than others.

The primary reason that migration occurs is often because of the changing economic landscape within the community in which people reside. As business grows, employment opportunities open up, and property values rise, the rates of residence among certain groups tend to change. Demography and local culture both play a role in the way people move from place to place.

Because migration can be a very natural process, demography and its effects on a state's population can be easily tracked. There are even tools available online that allow anyone to look at a particular county in Missouri and see what kind of population it has. This is helpful when studying the migration trends of a specific ethnic group, like the Black population or the Native American population. Demographics can provide important clues about how a town or city will fit into its surrounding area or what kind of economic growth it might experience in the future.