Looking for a Facebook Ads Agency?

We’re a team of twenty-three web, digital marketing, SEO, and operations professionals. Heaviside Group was founded in 2011 as a side project and has continued to grow and expand year after year.

Our group is divided into four internal teams: Web, Digital Marketing, SEO, and Operations. Each team has specialists in those disciplines, and they work together to deliver projects accurately and on-time. Everything is managed by our operations team, which provides sales, customer service, and project management support to our clients.

In 2017, we launched our Heaviside Digital platform, designed to provide high-quality web, digital marketing, and SEO services to businesses with lower marketing budgets.

SERVICES

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Facebook Ads – Consultation
$125.00
Up to one-hour phone consultation, with screen share if needed. Troubleshoot, audit, review, etc. Audit may reduce live call time.
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Facebook Ads – Basic
4.9
(75)
$300.00 / month
We will build your Facebook Ads campaign and manage spend up to $500 per month.
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Facebook Ads – Standard
4.8
(76)
$450.00 / month
We will build your Facebook Ads campaign and manage spend up to $1,000 per month.
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Facebook Ads – Premium
4.9
(75)
$795.00 / month
We will build your Facebook Ads campaign and manage spend up to $4,000 per month.
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REVIEWS

jeffersonlew232
jeffersonlew232
5/5

You did an amazing job

2 years ago
driftersldn
driftersldn
5/5

Really diligent and patient, thank you so much!

2 years ago
socialdesigners
socialdesigners
5/5

Another month with heavisidegroup and I'm very happy with their work!

2 years ago
jacksum
jacksum
5/5

They did manage the ad campaign on fb as promised .... although we didn’t see any sales they did do their part in running the ads and managing them as promised .

2 years ago
milcaguadalupe
milcaguadalupe
5/5

It was a very good experience. I appreciate their patience and hard work.

2 years ago

About Service

A Facebook Ads Agency basically handles Facebook marketing campaigns for the clients. These days, there has never been a greater time to begin a new business online than right now. One of today's most popular lifestyle companies you could develop from nothing is a Facebook marketing agency. With the huge number of potential customers on Facebook, it's vital to constantly drive qualified traffic to one's business website. A Facebook campaign can also be used to generate lead generation which can be extremely profitable.

When it comes to creating Facebook ads campaigns, it's important to stay as generic as possible. Don't give away too much information about your company's specific product or service up front. Targeting specific demographics is ideal and by targeting specific markets you'll easily be able to increase your customer base. A Facebook ads agency has the expertise to create ad campaigns that are completely tailored to each and every client. They know how to effectively target demographics and create an ad campaign that will deliver results.

Targeting specific markets is essential because this way you'll be more likely to retain those customers. Remember, a person who isn't interested in your product is likely not going to click on your ad. However, they could still be on your mailing list. Using the data from your Facebook ads clients, the ad marketers will create ads that will target the people who want what you have to offer, and you'll increase your sales!

It's not hard to generate leads with a Facebook ads agency either. By targeting your ads based on keywords, location, gender, age or any other form of demographic you'll quickly get clients clicking through to your website. It's that simple and effective. So you don't need to spend hours posting messages on social media sites when you could be generating leads on autopilot with a great advertising agency and web marketing tool.

Don't believe that the sky is the limit with advertising online. There are so many businesses trying to market online that it can be difficult to find quality leads that actually want to buy something. But you won't have to spend all day posting messages on social networking sites trying to drum up business as you can let a professional advertising agency to do that for you. The real money is in quality campaigns that target people who are actually looking for what you have to offer. It's much easier to sell to the masses than it is to sell to a group of individuals who are already halfway vested.

Once you've got quality leads, your next step is to convert them into sales. That's where retargeting ad campaigns come in. These campaigns allow you to target people already interested in what you have to offer but who are not ready to make a purchase just yet. With retargeting campaigns you simply need to send them a message asking them if they are ready to take that next step and give you their name, email, phone number, and the URL where they can find more information about your products and services. You can then follow up with a second message asking them if they still want to take the action you requested of them. By doing this you're increasing your chances of converting those leads into actual sales, which will increase your chances of making more money from Facebook ads.

ABOUT Bowling Green

The first Europeans known to have reached the area carved their names on beech trees near the river around 1775. By 1778, settlers established McFadden's Station on the north bank of the Barren River.

Present-day Bowling Green developed from homesteads erected by Robert and George Moore and General Elijah Covington, the namesake of the town near Cincinnati.[citation needed] The Moore brothers arrived from Virginia circa 1794. In 1798, two years after Warren County had been formed, Robert Moore donated 2 acres (8,100 m2) of land to county trustees for the purpose of constructing public buildings. Soon after, he donated an additional 30 to 40 acres (120,000 to 160,000 m2) surrounding the original plot. The city of Bowling Green was officially incorporated by the Commonwealth of Kentucky on March 6, 1798.

Some controversy exists over the source of the town's name. The city refers to the first county commissioners' meeting (1798), which named the town "Bolin Green" after the Bowling Green in New York City, where patriots had pulled down a statue of King George III and used the lead to make bullets during the American Revolution. According to the Encyclopedia of Kentucky, the name was derived from Bowling Green, Virginia, from where early migrants had come, or the personal "ball alley game" of founder Robert Moore. Early records indicate that the city name was also spelled "Bowlingreen".

By 1810, Bowling Green had 154 residents. Growth in steamboat commerce and the proximity of the Barren River increased Bowling Green's prominence. Canal locks and dams on the Barren River made it much more navigable. In 1832, the first portage railway connected the river to the location of the current county courthouse. Mules pulled freight and passengers to and from the city on the tracks.

Despite rapid urbanization of the Bowling Green area in the 1830s, agriculture remained an important part of local life. A visitor to Bowling Green noted the boasting of a tavern proprietor named Benjamin Vance:

In 1859, the Louisville and Nashville Railroad (currently CSX Transportation) laid railroad through Bowling Green that connected the city with northern and southern markets.

Bowling Green declared itself neutral in an attempt to escape the Civil War. Because of its prime location and resources, however, both the Union and Confederacy sought control of the city. The majority of its residents rejected both the Confederacy and the Lincoln administration. On September 18, 1861, around 1300 Confederate soldiers arrived from Tennessee to occupy the city, placed under command of Kentucky native General Simon Bolivar Buckner. The city's pro-Union feelings surprised the Confederate occupiers. The Confederates fortified surrounding hills to secure possible military approaches to the valuable river and railroad assets. In November 1861, the provisional Confederate government of Kentucky chose Bowling Green as its capital.

On February 14, 1862, after receiving reports that Fort Henry on the Tennessee River and Fort Donelson on the Cumberland River had both been captured by Union forces under Ulysses S. Grant, the Confederates began to withdraw from Bowling Green. They destroyed bridges across the Barren River, the railroad depot, and other important buildings that could be used by the enemy. The city was subject to disruptions and raids throughout the remainder of the war. During the summer of 1864, Union General Stephen G. Burbridge arrested 22 civilians in and around Bowling Green on a charge of treason. This incident and other harsh treatment by federal authorities led to bitterness toward the Union among Bowling Green residents and increased sympathies with the Confederacy.

After the Civil War, Bowling Green's business district grew considerably. Previously, agriculture had dominated the city's economy. During the 1870s, many of the historic business structures seen today were erected. One of the most important businesses in Bowling Green of this era was Carie Burnam Taylor's dress-making company. By 1906, Taylor employed more than 200 women.

In 1868, the city constructed its first waterworks system. The fourth county courthouse was completed in 1868. The first three were completed in 1798, 1805, and 1813. In 1889, the first mule-drawn street cars appeared in the city. The first electric street cars began to replace them by 1895.

The Sisters of Charity of Nazareth founded St. Columbia's Academy in 1862, succeeded by St. Joseph's School in 1911. In 1884, the Southern Normal School, which had been founded in 1875, moved to Bowling Green from the town of Glasgow, Kentucky. Pleasant J. Potter founded a women's college in Bowling Green in 1889. It closed in 1909 and its property was sold to the Western Kentucky State Normal School (see below, now known as Western Kentucky University). Other important schools in this era were Methodist Warren College, Ogden College (which also became a part of Western Kentucky University), and Green River Female College, a boarding school.

In 1906, Henry Hardin Cherry, the president and owner of Southern Normal School, donated the school to the state as the basis of the Western State Normal School. The school trained teachers for the expanding educational needs of the state. This institution is now known as Western Kentucky University and is the second-largest public university in the state, having recently surpassed the University of Louisville.

In 1906, Doctors Lillian H. South, J. N. McCormack, and A.T. McCormack opened St. Joseph Hospital to provide medical and nursing care to the residents and students in the area.

In 1925, the third and last Louisville and Nashville Railroad Station was opened. About 27 trains arrived daily at the depot. Intercity bus lines were also a popular form of travel. By the 1960s, railroad travel had dramatically declined in the face of competition from airlines and automobiles. The station has been adapted for use as a museum.

In 1940, a Union Underwear factory built in Bowling Green bolstered the city's economy significantly. During the 1960s, the city's population began to surpass that of Ashland, Paducah, and Newport.

Downtown streets became a bottleneck for traffic. In 1949, the U.S. Route 31W Bypass was opened to alleviate traffic problems, but it also drew off business from downtown. The bypass grew to become a business hotspot in Bowling Green. A 1954 advertisement exclaimed, "Your business can grow in the direction Bowling Green is growing – to the 31-W By-Pass".

By the 1960s, the face of shopping was changing completely from the downtown retail square to suburban shopping centers. Between May and November 1967, stores in Bowling Green Mall opened for business. Another advertisement said, "One-stop shopping. Just park , step out and shop. You'll find everything close at hand." Between September 1979 and September 1980, stores in the larger Greenwood Mall came on line. The city's limits began to stretch toward Interstate 65.

By the late 1960s, Interstate 65, which runs just to the east of Bowling Green, was completed. The Green River Parkway (now called the William H. Natcher Parkway), was completed in the 1970s to connect Bowling Green and Owensboro. These vital transportation arteries attracted many industries to Bowling Green.

In 1981, General Motors moved its Chevrolet Corvette assembly plant from St. Louis, Missouri, to Bowling Green. In the same year, the National Corvette Homecoming event was created: it is a large, annual gathering of Corvette owners, car parades, and related activities in Bowling Green. In 1994, the National Corvette Museum was constructed near the assembly plant.

In 1997, Bowling Green was designated a Tree City USA by the National Arbor Day Foundation.

In 2012, the city undertook a feasibility study on ways to revitalize the downtown Bowling Green area. The Downtown Redevelopment Authority was formed to plan redevelopment. Plans for the project incorporated Bowling Green's waterfront assets, as well as its historic center and streetscape around Fountain Square. It also proposed a new building for the Bowling Green Area Chamber of Commerce, construction of a Riverwalk Park where downtown borders the Barren River, creation of a new public park called Circus Square, and installation of a new retail area, the Fountain Square Market.

As of spring 2009, the new Chamber of Commerce, Riverwalk Park, and Circus Square have been completed. The Southern Kentucky Performing Arts Center, a facility for arts and education, broke ground in October 2009 and celebrated its opening night on March 10, 2012, with a concert by Vince Gill. Ground was broken for the Fountain Square Market in 2012.

In 2005, an effort was made to incorporate a Whitewater Park into the downtown Bowling Green riverfront at Weldon Peete Park. Due to the recession, the project was not funded.

In 2011, the Bowling Green Riverfront Foundation expanded its efforts to develop land on the opposite side of Barren River from Mitch McConnell Park (which is located alongside the U.S. 31-W Bypass and the riverbank, between Louisville Road and Old Louisville Road), upriver to Peete Park. The new plans include use of the adjacent river for white-water sports—the stretch of river includes rapids rated on the International Scale of River Difficulty between Class II and Class IV—as well as a mountain biking trail, a bicycle pump track, and a rock climbing area. Some of this facility will be located on a reclaimed landfill, which had served as Bowling Green's garbage dump for many years.

As of the census of 2010, 58,067 people and 22,735 households resided in the city. The population density was 1631.1 people per square mile (630.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 75.8% White, 13.9% African American, 0.3% Native American, 4.2% Asian, 0.2% Pacific Islander, 2.16% from other races, and 2.7% from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 6.5% of the population.

Of the 22,735 households, 24.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 33.1% were married couples living together, 14.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 48.3% were not families. About 35.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 19.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.28, and the average family size was 2.99.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 20.1% under the age of 18, 28% from 15 to 24, 25.6% from 25 to 44, 18.8% from 45 to 64, and 10.6% who were 65 or older. The median age was 27.6 years. Females made up 51.7% of the population and males made up 48.3%.

The median income for a household in the city was $33,362, and for families was $45,287. Males had a median income of $35,000 versus $28,916 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,302. About 19.4% of families and 27.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 30.9% of those under age 18.

About Kentucky

Kentucky is a historic southern state bordered by the Appalachian Mountains in the south and the Ohio River in the west. The largest city, Louisville, is also home to the Kentucky Derby, America's largest horse race. The three-day festival, celebrated at Churchill Downs in Louisville, is followed by a two-week festival. Here you'll see the beautiful and historic Churchill Downs Race Course, the home of the Kentucky Derby.

Kentucky is one of the most popular southern states for a number of reasons. It is an attractive southern state with a lot of southern charm. Kentucky's economy is based around its coal and steel companies. There is also a major wine industry in Kentucky. Kentucky's history is also very rich, which gives visitors a fascinating glimpse into this interesting southern American culture.

Demography. Kentucky is the most densely populated southern state in America. The last decade saw the fastest population growth in any state of the Union, with an addition of more than one million people. As the country grows, the trend is expected to continue upward. The growing population is due in large part to an increase in immigration, especially from southern Mexico and other Latin American countries.

History. One of America's oldest cities, Louisville is one of the oldest cities in all of the South. A Civil War reunion will celebrate the Second City, which is close to downtown. This area was one of the best army training and combat zones in the nation.

Geography. Kentucky has a coastline that provides opportunities for great fishing and surfing. There are opportunities for many types of water sports as well, including boating and kayaking. For those interested in more natural wildlife, there are several national parks in Kentucky. With over 400 species of birds and over one million acres of forests and grasslands, nature lovers will want to visit frequently.

Historic Landmarks. One of the most important parts of Kentucky's heritage is its history. From its early pioneer beginnings through the Civil War, Kentucky has had many memorable moments that can be enjoyed today. From the Kentucky Derby to the historic Martin Luther King Jr. Papers, there are several famous landmarks in Kentucky that draw millions of visitors each year.

Historical Museums. There are many excellent historical museums in Kentucky, including the Kentucky Historical Museum and the Kentucky State Museum. These are just two of many in this charming southern state. They are home to numerous artifacts, such as original maps, weapons, and other fascinating items. Many of these are also on display at various galleries around the state.

Landmarks and Monuments. In addition to having many beautiful landmarks in Kentucky, it also has a few very important historic monuments. The Kentucky State Capitol is one of the most important, as it represents one of the most important periods in Kentucky's history. Other popular monuments include the Kentucky Supreme Court and the Louisville courthouse. Visitors to these landmarks will be able to take part in tours, view a special evening program or presentation or even take part in a round table discussion.

Great Restaurants. Kentucky has a great selection of fine dining restaurants, from family-friendly country clubs to elegant fine dining locations. You will also find an incredible variety of casual restaurants, from country clubs to bar-b-q themed restaurants. You will be able to enjoy all of the great food and entertainment any time you choose.

Kentucky Aquarium and Botanical Garden. If you are looking for an activity that everyone can enjoy, Kentucky's state parks are filled with fun for all ages and skill levels. There are several different types of parks, including nature preserves, historic sites and aquatic parks. You will also find the Kentucky Aquarium and Botanical Garden, which are perfect for families. In this park, you can enjoy waterfalls, live animals and more. This park also offers several fitness clubs and kid-friendly activities.

Kentucky Zoo and Memorial. When you visit Kentucky, you should also stop by the Kentucky Zoo and Memorial. This park offers a number of different attractions for all ages, from a number of animal shows to hands-on experiences with some of the most unique animals on earth. You will also find several great food vendors and food shops in the area. This is one attraction that is not to be missed. There are also several other exciting experiences to be found at the zoo.

Kentucky's largest city, Louisville, is located within close proximity to several other major cities. If you are looking for a great weekend trip, consider traveling to Louisville. With several different attractions, great shopping and family-friendly locales, you will be glad that you called Kentucky home.