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About Service

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ABOUT Iowa City

Iowa City was created by an act of Legislative Assembly of the Iowa Territory on January 21, 1839, fulfilling the desire of Governor Robert Lucas to move the capital out of Burlington and closer to the center of the territory. This act began:

Commissioners Chauncey Swan and John Ronalds met on May 1 in the small settlement of Napoleon, south of present-day Iowa City, to select a site for the new capital city. The following day the commissioners selected a site on bluffs above the Iowa River north of Napoleon, placed a stake in the center of the proposed site and began planning the new capital city. Commissioner Swan, in a report to the legislature in Burlington, described the site:

By June of that year, the town had been platted and surveyed from Brown St. in the north to Burlington St. in the south, and from the Iowa River eastward to Governor St.

While Iowa City was selected as the territorial capital in 1839, it did not officially become the capital city until 1841; after construction on the capitol building had begun. The capitol building was completed in 1842, and the last four territorial legislatures and the first six Iowa General Assemblies met there until 1857, when the state capital was moved to Des Moines.

John F. Rague is credited with designing the Territorial Capitol Building. He had previously designed the 1837 capitol of Illinois and was supervising its construction when he got the commission to design the new Iowa capitol in 1839. He quit the Iowa project after five months, claiming his design was not followed, but the resemblance to the Illinois capitol suggests he strongly influenced the final Iowa design. One surviving 1839 sketch of the proposed capital shows a radically different layout, with two domes and a central tower. The cornerstone of the Old Capitol Building was laid in Iowa City on July 4, 1840. Iowa City served as the third and last territorial capital of Iowa, and the last four territorial legislatures met at the Old Capitol Building until December 28, 1846, when Iowa was admitted into the United States as the 29th state of the union. Iowa City was declared the state capital of Iowa, and the government convened in the Old Capitol Building.

Oakland Cemetery was deeded to "the people of Iowa City" by the Iowa territorial legislature on February 13, 1843. The original plot was one block square, with the southwest corner at Governor and Church. Over the years the cemetery has been expanded and now encompasses 40 acres. Oakland Cemetery is a non-perpetual care city cemetery. This cemetery is supported by city taxes. The staff is strongly committed to the maintenance and preservation of privately owned lots and accessories. Since its establishment, the cemetery has become the final resting place of many men and women important in the history of Iowa, of Iowa City and the University of Iowa. These include Robert E. Lucas, first governor of the territory (1838–41); Samuel J. Kirkwood, governor during the Civil War (1860–64), again in 1876, a U.S. senator in 1877, and subsequently secretary of the interior and U.S. minister to Spain; well-known presidents of the university, Walter A. Jessup (1915–33) and Virgil M. Hancher (1940–64); Cordelia Swan, daughter of one of the three commissioners who selected the site for Iowa City and the new territorial capitol; and Irving B. Weber (1900–1997), noted Iowa City historian. It is also home to the legendary monument called the "Black Angel", which is an 8.5-foot tall monument for the Feldevert family erected in 1912. The facts behind the Black Angel long ago gave way to myths, superstitions and legend surrounding its mysterious change in color from a golden bronze cast to an eerie black.

Founded in 1847, today's University of Iowa offers more than 100 areas of study to 31,112 students. The University includes a medical school and one of the United States' largest university-owned teaching hospitals, providing patient care within 16 medical specialties. Iowa City is also the location of Mercy Hospital. The university University of Iowa College of Law is located there.

The spring of 1970 was a tumultuous time on college campuses. On April 30, President Richard Nixon announced that U.S. forces would invade Cambodia because of the recent communist coup. Students around the country protested this escalation of the Vietnam War. On May 4, the National Guard fired on students at Kent State University, killing four and wounding nine people, which ignited protests all over the country.

Anti-war protests were not new to Iowa City or to elsewhere in Iowa; protests had been occurring throughout the 1960s. Spring of 1970 was different.

After the Kent State shootings, students marched on the National Guard Armory, broke windows there as well as in some downtown businesses. The City Council gave the mayor curfew powers. On May 6, there was a student boycott of classes. That night, about 400 people had a "sleep-in" in front of the Old Capitol. That night also, about 50 people broke into the Old Capitol and set off a smoke bomb. The protesters left voluntarily when asked to do so. Around 2 am Friday morning, President Boyd requested arrest of the students on the Pentacrest by highway patrolmen, but the next day he regretted the mass arrests and said he had received faulty information. On May 8, President Boyd cancelled the 89th annual Governor's day ROTC observance for the following day. On Friday and Saturday a National Guard helicopter circled the Pentacrest.

In the early morning hours of Saturday, May 9, the Old Armory Temporary (O.A.T.), also known as "Big Pink", which housed the writing lab, was burned down. This building was located next to the Old Armory, where the Adler Journalism and Mass Communications building currently is located. O.A.T was said to be at the top of a list of buildings for burning, probably due to its poor condition and was considered a firetrap.

The Iowa Alumni Review includes an article about the fire in which the author states: "Only the ends stayed upright. ... On the south, Lou Kelly's Writing lab bearing the sign 'another mother for peace,' escaped." There was a second, smaller fire on Saturday evening in a restroom in the East Hall Annex.

By Sunday morning, President Boyd gave students the option to leave. Classes were not cancelled but students could leave and take the grade they currently had. An account of the May 1970 protests can be read in the June–July issue of the Iowa Alumni Review.

In his autobiography, My Iowa Journey: The Life Story of the University of Iowa's First African American Professor, Philip Hubbard (University Vice-Provost in 1970) gives an administrator's perspective of all the protests of the 1960s. He supported the students' right to protest and in 1966 stated: "Students should not accept everything that is dished out to them. We don't want to dictate what they should or should not do. However, student demonstrations should remain within the law and good taste without interfering with the university's primary purpose of instructing students."

During this time, there was also a strong ROTC presence on campus. Their presence on campus and the academic credit they received for their service was called into question by both students and faculty in the spring of 1970, but Boyd said he could not abolish ROTC. The Alumni Review had an article called "ROTC: Alive and well at Iowa" in the December 1969 issue which helps provide a more complete picture of this period in history.

On the evening of April 13, 2006, a confirmed EF2 tornado struck Iowa City, causing severe property damage and displacing many from their homes, including many University of Iowa students. It was the first tornado ever recorded to hit the city directly. No serious injuries were reported in the Iowa City area.

A popular Dairy Queen, which had been in business for 54 years, was a victim of the storm (but it reopened in late September), along with two large car dealerships, and several other businesses along Riverside Drive and Iowa Highway 1. The 134-year-old Saint Patrick's Catholic Church was heavily damaged only minutes after Holy Thursday Mass, with most of its roof destroyed. The building was ruled a total loss and has since been demolished. The downtown business district as well as the eastern residential area and several parks suffered scattered damage of varying degrees.

Additionally, several houses in the sorority row area were destroyed. The Alpha Chi Omega house was nearly destroyed, though no one was injured. The building was later razed. Cleanup efforts were under way almost immediately as local law enforcement, volunteer workers from all over the state, and Iowa City residents and college students worked together to restore the city. The total cost of damage was estimated at around $12 million–$4 million of which was attributed to Iowa City and Johnson County property.

A local newspaper reported on June 11, 2008, that water exceeded the emergency spillway at the Coralville Reservoir outside of Iowa City. As a result, the City of Iowa City and the University of Iowa were seriously affected by unprecedented flooding of the Iowa River, which caused widespread property damage and forced evacuations in large sections of the city. By Friday, June 13, 2008, the Iowa River had risen to a record level of 30.46 feet (9.28 m) (5:00 pm CST) with a crest of approximately 33 feet (10 m) predicted for Wednesday, June 18, 2008. Much of the city's 500-year floodplain saw mild to catastrophic effects of the rapidly flowing, polluted water. Officials at the University of Iowa reported that up to 19 buildings were affected by rising waters. Extensive efforts to move materials from the University's main library were undertaken as large groups of sandbagging volunteers began to construct a massive levee near the building. Approximately $300 million worth of art, including work by Picasso, owned by the University was secretly moved to a holding place in the Chicago area before the fine arts area was heavily hit with flood water.

On Friday, June 13, university employees were encouraged to stay home, and travel was strongly discouraged in Iowa City; one city statement advised, "If you live in east Iowa City, stay in east Iowa City; if you live in west Iowa City, stay in west Iowa City." The Burlington St. bridge was the only bridge that remained open, other than the I-80 bridge on the edge of town, to connect the east and west sides of the Iowa River. On Saturday, June 14, officials at the University of Iowa began to power down the University's primary power generating plant along the Iowa River to prevent structural damage. Backup units continued to provide necessary power and steam services for essential University services, including the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. Water began touching the bottom of the Park St. bridge forcing the Army Corps of Engineers to drill several holes in the bridge to allow air trapped underneath to escape. Also on Saturday, Mayor Regenia Bailey issued a curfew restricting anyone except those authorized by law enforcement from being within 100 yards (91 m) of any area affected by the flood between 8:30 pm and 6 am.

Prior to the flood, a University of Iowa construction site was effectively damming the river just north of the bridge at Iowa Avenue and south of the train bridge crossing the river adjacent to the Iowa Memorial Union. The site had been erected ten months prior, presumably to work on the University of Iowa steam power and thermal control system. It is unknown whether the Army Corps of Engineers were persuaded by University officials to maintain water levels below 26 feet (7.9 m) to maintain the work site in the three weeks preceding the major flood event, or if Army Corps of Engineers made the decision to preserve the site on their own. Iowa City's riverside residents were aware of this, particularly those living along Normandy Drive adjacent to City Park. A cofferdam structure may have impeded flow of the river, and the Army Corps of Engineers' decision to forgo the discharge of additional multi-thousands of cubic feet of water in weeks prior has been criticized by many, and displaced residents even attempted to bring a class action lawsuit against the Army Corps of Engineers and the University of Iowa.

On October 4, 2019, a Friday climate school strike with Greta Thunberg was held in Iowa City, where school youths protested against coal power.

Iowa City is located in eastern Iowa, along the Iowa River, on Interstate 80, approximately 60 miles west of the Quad Cities (Davenport and Bettendorf, Iowa, and Moline and Rock Island, Illinois).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 25.28 square miles (65.47 km2), of which 25.01 square miles (64.78 km2) is land and 0.27 square miles (0.70 km2) is water.

The elevation at the Iowa City Municipal Airport is 668 ft (203.6 m) above sea level.

Iowa City has a humid continental climate, hot summer subtype (Dfa in the Köppen climate classification). Average monthly temperatures range from about 23.5 °F (−4.7 °C). in January to 75.5 °F (24.2 °C). in July. Average monthly precipitation is lowest in winter and peaks significantly from May to August, with June being the average wettest month. Showers and thunderstorms are common from May to September, and can be severe, especially from May to July. In winter, snowfall is moderate, occasionally heavy in single storms. Snow cover is occasional in drier and/or warmer winter seasons, but (rarely) can be continuous in the coldest seasons, such as that of 1978–79. The Iowa City area was struck by a severe hailstorm on May 18, 1997, and by tornadoes on April 13, 2006. Overall, Iowa City's tornado risk is lower than in areas to the south and southwest, such as Oklahoma, Kansas and Missouri.

Iowa City is commonly known as a college town. It is home to the University of Iowa and a small campus of Kirkwood Community College. The population increases during the months when the two schools are in session.

As of the 2010 census, about 58.0% of adults held a bachelor's degree or higher and 79.7% were white alone, not Hispanic or Latino, 6.2% were Asian alone, and 5.8% were black alone while the median household income was $41,410, about $10,000 less than the state median.

As of the census of 2010, there were 67,862 people, 27,657 households, and 11,743 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,713.4 inhabitants per square mile (1,047.6/km2). There were 29,270 housing units at an average density of 1,170.3 per square mile (451.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 82.5% White, 5.8% African American, 0.2% Native American, 6.9% Asian, 2.1% from other races, and 2.5% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.3% of the population.

There were 27,657 households, of which 19.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.5% were married couples living together, 7.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 2.8% had a male householder with no wife present, and 57.5% were non-families. 34.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.22 and the average family size was 2.88.

The median age in the city was 25.6 years. 14.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 33.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 25.7% were from 25 to 44; 17.8% were from 45 to 64; and 8.2% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.7% male and 50.3% female.

As of the census of 2000, there were 62,220 people, 25,202 households, and 11,189 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,575.0 inhabitants per square mile (994.2/km2). There were 26,083 housing units at an average density of 1,079.4 per square mile (416.8/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 87.33% White, 3.75% African American, 0.31% American Indian, 5.64% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 1.25% from other races, and 1.68% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.95% of the population.

There were 25,202 households, out of which 21.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 35.2% were married couples living together, 2% were households with same-sex couples (2000 U.S. Census), 3.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 55.6% were non-families. 33.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.23 and the average family size was 2.90.

Age spread: 16.2% under the age of 18, 32.8% from 18 to 24, 28.1% from 25 to 44, 15.9% from 45 to 64, and 7.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 25 years. For every 100 females, there were 96.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $34,977, and the median income for a family was $57,568. Males had a median income of $35,435 versus $28,981 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,269. About 2.7% of families and 4.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.2% of those under age 18 and 3.0% of those age 65 or over.

The Iowa City Metropolitan Statistical Area consists of Johnson and Washington counties in Iowa; Washington County was added to the MSA after the 2000 census. It had a 2000 census population of 131,676, and a 2010 population of 152,586.

Iowa City is flanked by Coralville and North Liberty. University Heights is completely contained within the boundaries of Iowa City, near Kinnick Stadium. Tiffin, Solon, and Hills are other small towns within a few miles.

The Iowa City MSA and the nearby Cedar Rapids MSA are collectively a Combined Statistical Area (CSA). This CSA along with two additional counties are known as the Iowa City-Cedar Rapids (ICR) Corridor and collectively have a population of over 450,000.

About Iowa

Known as the "land of 10,000 lakes," Iowa is a southern Midwestern U.S. State. It is synonymous with Midwestern heritage and cuisine. Iowa, a Midwestern U.S. State, sits between the Mississippi and Missouri rivers. It is known for its spectacular landscape of cornfields and rolling plains. Landmark in the capital, Des Moines, are the state capitol building, Pappajohn Sculpture Park, and the historic Des Moines Art Center.

A combination of eastern and western food, music and culture makes Iowa a unique destination. People from all around the world flock to Iowa each year to experience the warm and friendly people. Tourism has become the driving industry of the state and the number of visitors has increased every year since the turn of the millennium. The Des Moines Register ranked fifth in the state for tourist spending.

Iowa is famous for its agriculture and a major corn producer. Corn is used to make ethanol and also for feed. The tourism industry has grown tremendously and thousands of people from out of state come to visit every year. Many celebrities are drawn to Iowa including famed Desperate Housewives star Brandie May. Tourists from across the country visit Iowa to see the state's largest hog farm.

The Hawkeye State is very popular for outdoor activities. Deer hunting is a popular sport here and the hunting season is usually during the spring. People who love to fish enjoy the clean waters of Iowa. Bass, trout and walleye fishing are also popular pastimes. Motorized wheelchairs can be used by handicapped individuals to easily move around.

Iowa has a rich history. The "Iowa Gold Rush" gave rise to the construction of massive huts along the Iowa River. These huts provided easy shelter for settlers and their families. Iowa was an important route of American pioneers. Lincoln county was among them.

Iowa plays an important role in protecting the environment. The state is one of the nation's leading producers of renewable energy. The wind and solar power that the state possesses make use of a large portion of its natural resources. Many farmers depend on the wind and sun to help them grow crops. Tourism also benefits a great deal from the state because it brings in people to visit.

Iowa is extremely popular because of its attractions. The winter tourist season is especially popular. A lot of people go to Iowa during this time because it offers great skiing opportunities. The famous "Big Four" resorts are also located in Iowa.

Iowa is a lovely place to visit and work. There is a lot for people of all ages to do in Iowa. Iowa is a wonderful place for families and people of all ages can experience living in Iowa. You will not be disappointed with your decision to live in Iowa.

Real estate in Iowa is at an all-time high. The real estate prices have stabilized but still continue to rise in Iowa City and other cities around the state. Iowa City is known for its historic downtown area and shopping districts. Areas around Iowa City offer more affordable real estate and good living for less.

Areas around Iowa City and Cedar Falls have become very desirable for people who want to live in Iowa City and its surrounding areas. These areas are rapidly growing and offer some of the best living in the state. The real estate is cheaper than ever before and the schools are outstanding as well. Iowa City makes an excellent choice for a new home or investment property.

You can purchase real estate in Iowa from private, government, and corporate entities. Real estate transactions in Iowa can be complicated. When you purchase real estate in Iowa from a private individual or company it is in the name of that person or company. This makes it difficult for the state to trace the property's ownership and taxes. You may not know who is paying where until you call and ask.

Iowa has strict laws regarding real estate transactions. You must follow these laws if you want to purchase property. You can help protect yourself by having a lawyer represent you. When you purchase real estate in Iowa you have the right to fair market value. If the seller is unwilling to sell you a fair market value, you can ask the court to compel him or her to do so. The courts have the power to make deals that benefit buyers and sellers.