Looking for a Web Design Company?

We’re a team of twenty-three web, digital marketing, SEO, and operations professionals. Heaviside Group was founded in 2011 as a side project and has continued to grow and expand year after year.

Our group is divided into four internal teams: Web, Digital Marketing, SEO, and Operations. Each team has specialists in those disciplines, and they work together to deliver projects accurately and on-time. Everything is managed by our operations team, which provides sales, customer service, and project management support to our clients.

In 2017, we launched our Heaviside Digital platform, designed to provide high-quality web, digital marketing, and SEO services to businesses with lower marketing budgets.

HOW MUCH WILL YOUR WEBSITE COST?

Get a free quote for building the exact custom website you need.

GET STARTED

0$

Thank you, we will contact you soon!

Number of pages?

Select the number of pages that your website will have. Each unique URL counts as a page - if you're not sure chat with us. Don't count product pages here.

You need to select an item to continue

NEXT STEP

Ecommerce

If you plan on selling products or services on your site, check "I need ecommerce" below. Note that we build on WordPress with WooCommerce. If you're looking for something else, stop and chat with us.


You need to select an item to continue

NEXT STEP

Users/Members

If you need your visitors/customers to be able to log in and access documents or other items behind a login, choose "My site needs users/members" below.

You need to select an item to continue

NEXT STEP

Courses

If you plan on hosting courses via a Learning Management System or similar solution, choose "My site needs to host a course" below.

You need to select an item to continue

NEXT STEP

Custom Development

If you need custom development, select the right option below. If you need a custom plugin to enable certain functionality, or database work, or need to stitch multiple WooCommerce premium plugins together, we can help.

You need to select an item to continue

NEXT STEP

Content

If you need content written, select the number of pages you need - each page can have up to 1,000 words.

You need to select an item to continue

NEXT STEP

SEO

Migration-related SEO is included. If you want more advanced keyword research and on-page SEO implementation as part of the project, choose this.

The base cost is $300, plus $50 per page over 10.

You need to select an item to continue

NEXT STEP

Branding

We keep our prices down by including "Designed by Heaviside" as a footer credit. If you want to remove this, select the option below. Cost to remove is $200.

You need to select an item to continue

NEXT STEP

Final cost

The final estimated price is :

YOUR PROJECT IS APPROVED

Thanks for going through our quoting form! If you'd like to get started, please email this quote to yourself and contact us via chat or sales@heavisidegroup.com. We will create an invoice for 50% of the project cost, which is due to start the project. The final 50% will be invoiced upon completion prior to transfer of the site to your hosting.

APPROVAL NEEDED

You have selected functionality that requires custom approval. Please email the quote to yourself, and then forward to sales@heavisidegroup.com. We will review and either approve the quote or propose a new quote based on the information you provide.

You are seeing this if you selected "users/members", "course", or any kind of custom development. Please include the details of your project in your email for us to consider. The more detail the better. Thank you!

Summary

Description Information Quantity Price
Discount :
Total :

Email this to me

SERVICES

Filters Sort results
Reset Apply
Web Design – Basic
4.9
(42)
$750.00
Basic custom-designed website, up to four pages
Learn More
Add To Cart
Web Design – Standard
4.9
(42)
$1,495.00
E-commerce custom-designed website, up to 10 pages
Learn More
Add To Cart
Web Design – Premium
4.9
(42)
$2,495.00
Advanced custom-designed website, up to 15 pages
Learn More
Add To Cart

REVIEWS

tinabeezy
tinabeezy
5/5

I have a podcast and this is the first team that was able to provide what I needed to have a pretty and functional website. This was the best experience with a web designer/developer!! They were communicative, they were prompt, they were courteous, professional, and much more. I have two other businesses and will DEFINITELY use them again.

2 years ago
nrtbk2015
nrtbk2015
5/5

Despite a LOT of hiccups on my end, they pushed through and got exactly what I needed done. Very patient and great communication.

2 years ago
robcookkc
robcookkc
5/5

Great job!

2 years ago
timelessmedia
timelessmedia
5/5

They did a fabulous job, but it took longer than planned.

2 years ago
errolx1
errolx1
3/5

Working with Heavyside felt like that the design of the website is done by the customer and Heavyside will convert to WordPress and migrate to the internet

2 years ago

About Service

If you are looking to hire a web design company for your new website, there are some important questions you must ask first. There are three main elements involved when hiring a web design company, the first being what exactly you need your website to accomplish. The next is what type of experience does each of the companies you are investigating have, and the final question you must ask yourself is how much money will you be willing to spend on their services. By answering these three questions ahead of time, you can narrow down your search and make sure that the web design company you eventually choose will fit into your business plan.

Web design business. A web design company consists of four different departments: Design department deals with all the graphic designs and graphics on the websites. Web Development is responsible for all programming the website, both the coding and the style. Marketing Department handles any analysis that might be necessary, business goals, and content.

It is very important to hire a professional website designer or developer who has years of experience. A simple website does not mean a professional website. While most web design companies offer basic website design packages for purchase, they usually charge more for professional website design. Web development usually consists of building and maintaining a basic website with many features that can be customized. Web designers and developers are very creative and can create a very nice looking simple website that has all the features you are looking for.

There are many different tools that are available to help with designing your website. There are many different types of programs that allow you to set up a simple website, and there are many different tools that help you manage all of the information on your site. You can choose whether to have an online store, or if you want your customers to be able to order from your home page. This all depends on how much you want to customize your site, and what features you think will benefit your company the most.

Some of the top website designers and developers use flash, HTML, JavaScript, and many other tools that make it very easy for web designers and developers to get a very professional website up and running in very little time. There are many different features that you can add to a simple website. You can change the color scheme, change the fonts, change the borders, and many other features. Most web designers and developers use a lot of flash based features to make the web pages very interactive and appealing. You will find that there are many different things that you can do with the code that is built into your website.

Many website designers and developers use professional website designs and web development companies to get their sites looking exactly how they want. The professional web designers can create a website layout or design that will work exactly the way that you want it too. You should be sure that you hire a web development company that uses high quality web design principles.

Web Design Company Fort Lauderdale, Florida

ABOUT Fort Lauderdale

The area in which the city of Fort Lauderdale would later be founded was inhabited for more than two thousand years by the Tequesta Indians. Contact with Spanish explorers in the 16th century proved disastrous for the Tequesta, as the Europeans unwittingly brought with them diseases, such as smallpox, to which the native populations possessed no resistance. For the Tequesta, disease, coupled with continuing conflict with their Calusa neighbors, contributed greatly to their decline over the next two centuries. By 1763, there were only a few Tequesta left in Florida, and most of them were evacuated to Cuba when the Spanish ceded Florida to the British in 1763, under the terms of the Treaty of Paris (1763), which ended the Seven Years' War. Although control of the area changed between Spain, United Kingdom, the United States, and the Confederate States of America, it remained largely undeveloped until the 20th century.

The Fort Lauderdale area was known as the "New River Settlement" before the 20th century. In the 1830s, there were approximately 70 settlers living along the New River. William Cooley, the local Justice of the Peace, was a farmer and wrecker, who traded with the Seminole Indians. On January 6, 1836, while Cooley was leading an attempt to salvage a wrecked ship, a band of Seminoles attacked his farm, killing his wife and children, and the children's tutor. The other farms in the settlement were not attacked, but all the white residents in the area abandoned the settlement, fleeing first to the Cape Florida Lighthouse on Key Biscayne, and then to Key West.

The first United States stockade named Fort Lauderdale was built in 1838, and subsequently was a site of fighting during the Second Seminole War. The fort was abandoned in 1842, after the end of the war, and the area remained virtually unpopulated until the 1890s. It was not until Frank Stranahan arrived in the area in 1893 to operate a ferry across the New River, and the Florida East Coast Railroad's completion of a route through the area in 1896, that any organized development began. The city was incorporated in 1911, and in 1915, was designated the county seat of newly formed Broward County.

Fort Lauderdale's first major development began in the 1920s, during the Florida land boom. The 1926 Miami Hurricane and the Great Depression of the 1930s caused a great deal of economic dislocation. In July 1935, an African-American man named Rubin Stacy was accused of robbing a white woman at knife point. He was arrested and being transported to a Miami jail when police were run off the road by a mob. A group of 100 white men proceeded to hang Stacy from a tree near the scene of his alleged robbery. His body was riddled with some twenty bullets. The murder was subsequently used by the press in Nazi Germany to discredit U.S. critiques of its own persecution of Jews, Communists, and Catholics.

When World War II began, Fort Lauderdale became a major U.S. base, with a Naval Air Station to train pilots, radar operators, and fire control operators. A Coast Guard base at Port Everglades was also established.

Until July 1961, only whites were allowed on Ft. Lauderdale beaches. There were no beaches for African-Americans in Broward County until 1954, when "the Colored Beach," today Dr. Von D. Mizell-Eula Johnson State Park, was opened in Dania Beach; however, no road was built to it until 1965. On July 4, 1961, African Americans started a series of wade-ins as protests at beaches that were off-limits to them, to protest "the failure of the county to build a road to the Negro beach.":30 On July 11, 1962, a verdict by Ted Cabot went against the city's policy of racial segregation of public beaches, and Broward County beaches were desegregated in 1962.

Today, Fort Lauderdale is a major yachting center, one of the nation's largest tourist destinations, and the center of a metropolitan division with 1.8 million people.

After the war ended, service members returned to the area, spurring an enormous population explosion that dwarfed the 1920s boom. The 1960 Census counted 83,648 people in the city, about 230% of the 1950 figure. A 1967 report estimated that the city was approximately 85% developed, and the 1970 population figure was 139,590.

After 1970, as Fort Lauderdale became essentially built out, growth in the area shifted to suburbs to the west. As cities such as Coral Springs, Miramar, and Pembroke Pines experienced explosive growth, Fort Lauderdale's population stagnated, and the city actually shrank by almost 4,000 people between 1980, when the city had 153,279 people, and 1990, when the population was 149,377. A slight rebound brought the population back up to 152,397 at the 2000 census. Since 2000, Fort Lauderdale has gained slightly over 18,000 residents through annexation of seven neighborhoods in unincorporated Broward County.

As of 2010, those of Hispanic or Latino ancestry accounted for 13.7% of Fort Lauderdale's population. Out of the 13.7%, 2.5% were Cuban, 2.3% Puerto Rican, 1.7% Mexican, 1.1% Colombian, 0.9% Guatemalan, 0.8% Salvadoran, 0.6% Honduran, and 0.6% were Peruvian.

As of 2010, those of African ancestry accounted for 31.0% of Fort Lauderdale's population, which includes African Americans. Out of the 31.0%, 10.0% were West Indian or Afro-Caribbean American (6.4% Haitian, 2.5% Jamaican, 0.4% Bahamian, 0.2% Other or Unspecified West Indian, 0.2% British West Indian, 0.1% Trinidadian and Tobagonian, 0.1% Barbadian), 0.6% were Black Hispanics, and 0.5% were Subsaharan African.

As of 2010, those of (non-Hispanic white) European ancestry accounted for 52.5% of Fort Lauderdale's population. Out of the 52.5%, 10.3% were Irish, 10.1% German, 8.1% Italian, 7.1% English, 3.0% Polish, 2.1% French, 1.9% Russian, 1.7% Scottish, 1.2% Scotch-Irish, 1.0% Dutch, 1.0% Swedish, 0.6% Greek, 0.6% Hungarian, 0.5% Norwegian, and 0.5% were French Canadian.

As of 2010, those of Asian ancestry accounted for 1.5% of Fort Lauderdale's population. Out of the 1.5%, 0.4% were Indian, 0.3% Filipino, 0.3% Other Asian, 0.2% Chinese, 0.1% Vietnamese, 0.1% Japanese, and 0.1% were Korean.

As of 2010, 0.6% were of Arab ancestry.

In 2010, 7.1% of the population considered themselves to be of only American ancestry (regardless of race or ethnicity).

As of 2010, there were 74,786 occupied households, while 19.7% were vacant. 17.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 30.4% were married couples living together, 12.3% have a female head of household with no husband present, and 52.4% were non-families. 39.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older (4.8% male and 6.3% female.) The average household size was 2.17 and the average family size was 3.00.

In 2010, the city population was spread out, with 17.6% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 28.4% from 25 to 44, 30.6% from 45 to 64, and 15.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.2 years. For every 100 females, there were 111.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 113.1 males.

As of 2010, the median income for a household in the city was $49,818, and the median income for a family was $59,238. Males had a median income of $46,706 versus $37,324 for females. The per capita income for the city was $35,828. About 13.1% of families and 18.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 30.3% of those under age 18 and 12.5% of those aged 65 or over.

In 2010, 21.3% of the city's population was foreign-born. Of foreign-born residents, 69.6% were born in Latin America and 15.3% were born in Europe, with smaller percentages from North America, Africa, Asia, and Oceania.

In 2000, Fort Lauderdale had the twenty-sixth highest percentage of Haitian residents in the US, at 6.9% of the city's population, and the 127th highest percentage of Cuban residents, at 1.7% of the city's residents.

Like South Florida in general, Fort Lauderdale has many residents who can speak languages other than English, although its proportion is lower than the county average. As of 2000, 75.63% of the population spoke only English at home, while 24.37% spoke other first languages. Speakers of Spanish were 9.43%, French Creole (mostly Haitian Creole) 7.52%, French 2.04%, Portuguese 1.02%, Italian 0.82%, and German at 0.80%.

The city, along with adjacent small cities Oakland Park and Wilton Manors, is known for its notably large LGBT community, and has one of the highest ratios of gay men and lesbians, with gay men being more largely present. The city is also known as a popular vacation spot for gays and lesbians, with many LGBT or LGBT-friendly hotels and guesthouses. Fort Lauderdale hosts the Stonewall Library & Archives, and in neighboring Wilton Manors, there is the Pride Center, a large LGBT community center, in addition to the World AIDS Museum and Educational Center. The current Mayor of Fort Lauderdale, Dean Trantalis, is the first openly gay person to hold this office.

About Florida

Florida is commonly called "The Sunshine State" or more commonly known as "The Sunshine State." Florida is situated in the southeast area of the U.S., within the state lines of Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, and Tennessee. Florida is also known as the "Panhandle." Florida has a long history of being a popular travel destination with tourists from across the United States and internationally. Florida has seen a rise in home growth and development in recent years because of the popularity of this coastal state.

Geography of Florida: Florida is a peninsula in the south-eastern panhandle of what was once the panhandle of the U.S., which is now known as Florida. Florida has the second-lowest cost per square foot of any state in the nation. Florida is divided into six major counties: county seat Saint Petersburg/St Augustine, county seat Daytona Beach, Orange County, Putnam County, Hillsborough County, and Seminole County. Geographically, Florida consists of three major geographical division areas: The Florida Panhandle, which is south of the Florida Keys; the Florida intra-regional; and the Florida Atlantic.

Florida History: Florida is known for its long history. Florida man began settling in south Florida around the year 1830. At that time there were no schools in the area and the people were largely unemployed. As the population grew, however, Florida became one of the most popular places to live, especially for European immigrants. Florida was not only a thriving agricultural and manufacturing center but also a major sea port.

Florida demography has changed a lot since its early days. Today, Florida has one of the most diverse populations in the U.S. Because of this, Florida has much higher than average population density, making it one of the most diverse states in terms of race and ethnicity.

Florida Demography Florida's demography is changing rapidly. Florida has seen net migration in every decade since the end of the Great Depression. In addition to the south Florida, other states with large Hispanic populations such as Texas, Arizona and New Mexico are also moving to Florida. The fastest growing urban area in Florida is Jacksonville. However, despite its rapid growth, Florida continues to lose a larger percentage of its population to other states.

Florida Demography Florida has been an island through most of its history, and because of its location on the Gulf of Mexico, it has always had a critical role in shipping and in providing jobs to surrounding areas. As a result, Florida has maintained a healthy economy. Because of this, Florida continues to attract a large number of people due to its beaches, universities and professional sports teams. Florida is home to many popular national and international corporations.

Florida Demography Florida has a lot of diverse neighborhoods where people from various parts of America and even other countries have mixed blood. Many neighborhoods in Florida have experienced an influx of immigrants from Latin America, Asia, Eastern Europe and Africa. These neighborhoods provide a rich diversity of people but also challenge the social and cultural boundaries of Florida. They represent the new face of American culture in the 21st century.

Florida Demography Florida has a lot of historical sites and places that should be explored. The Florida Panhandle, which is Florida's largest city, offers a glimpse into the history and culture of the American South. Traveling on public transportation will take you through a section of Florida that is not familiar to many people but showcases many cultures and a variety of local food and music.

Southern Florida is filled with small, quiet neighborhoods. They are not heavily populated and offer a unique perspective of life in the Florida Panhandle. Miami is the financial center of Florida and also home to many people who have made it big in the business world. Miami has two big cultural areas. One is the district that is downtown and the second is the southern part of the city known as Brickell. Both are known for their high-class life styles and attract a large number of well-heeled people.

Southern Florida's geography is diverse. It is bordered on two sides by the Atlantic Ocean and on the east by the Gulf of Mexico. It is also surrounded by the Everglades. A part of Florida that is not as populated is the Florida Keys. These islands sit between the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico and offer a beautiful view of the southern sky. Florida also borders Georgia and the Carolinas on the west and Alabama and Texas on the east.

When Florida is mentioned most people think of Jacksonville and Orlando, but there are other cities that are equally, or even more, interesting. Some of the largest cities here are Tampa, which are one of the busiest cities in the state, and Fort Lauderdale, which is the largest city in south Florida. Other cities like Daytona Beach, Sarasota, Saint Augustine and West Palm Beach have some good population and offer great weather and activities.

Related Pages