Looking for a Web Design Company?

We’re a team of twenty-three web, digital marketing, SEO, and operations professionals. Heaviside Group was founded in 2011 as a side project and has continued to grow and expand year after year.

Our group is divided into four internal teams: Web, Digital Marketing, SEO, and Operations. Each team has specialists in those disciplines, and they work together to deliver projects accurately and on-time. Everything is managed by our operations team, which provides sales, customer service, and project management support to our clients.

In 2017, we launched our Heaviside Digital platform, designed to provide high-quality web, digital marketing, and SEO services to businesses with lower marketing budgets.

HOW MUCH WILL YOUR WEBSITE COST?

Get a free quote for building the exact custom website you need.

GET STARTED

0$

Thank you, we will contact you soon!

Number of pages?

Select the number of pages that your website will have. Each unique URL counts as a page - if you're not sure chat with us. Don't count product pages here.

You need to select an item to continue

NEXT STEP

Ecommerce

If you plan on selling products or services on your site, check "I need ecommerce" below. Note that we build on WordPress with WooCommerce. If you're looking for something else, stop and chat with us.


You need to select an item to continue

NEXT STEP

Users/Members

If you need your visitors/customers to be able to log in and access documents or other items behind a login, choose "My site needs users/members" below.

You need to select an item to continue

NEXT STEP

Courses

If you plan on hosting courses via a Learning Management System or similar solution, choose "My site needs to host a course" below.

You need to select an item to continue

NEXT STEP

Custom Development

If you need custom development, select the right option below. If you need a custom plugin to enable certain functionality, or database work, or need to stitch multiple WooCommerce premium plugins together, we can help.

You need to select an item to continue

NEXT STEP

Content

If you need content written, select the number of pages you need - each page can have up to 1,000 words.

You need to select an item to continue

NEXT STEP

SEO

Migration-related SEO is included. If you want more advanced keyword research and on-page SEO implementation as part of the project, choose this.

The base cost is $300, plus $50 per page over 10.

You need to select an item to continue

NEXT STEP

Branding

We keep our prices down by including "Designed by Heaviside" as a footer credit. If you want to remove this, select the option below. Cost to remove is $200.

You need to select an item to continue

NEXT STEP

Final cost

The final estimated price is :

YOUR PROJECT IS APPROVED

Thanks for going through our quoting form! If you'd like to get started, please email this quote to yourself and contact us via chat or sales@heavisidegroup.com. We will create an invoice for 50% of the project cost, which is due to start the project. The final 50% will be invoiced upon completion prior to transfer of the site to your hosting.

APPROVAL NEEDED

You have selected functionality that requires custom approval. Please email the quote to yourself, and then forward to sales@heavisidegroup.com. We will review and either approve the quote or propose a new quote based on the information you provide.

You are seeing this if you selected "users/members", "course", or any kind of custom development. Please include the details of your project in your email for us to consider. The more detail the better. Thank you!

Summary

Description Information Quantity Price
Discount :
Total :

Email this to me

SERVICES

Filters Sort results
Web Design – Basic
4.9
(42)
$750.00

Basic custom-designed website, up to four pages

Learn More
Add To Cart
Web Design – Standard
4.9
(42)
$1,495.00

E-commerce custom-designed website, up to 10 pages

Learn More
Add To Cart
Web Design – Premium
4.9
(42)
$2,495.00

Advanced custom-designed website, up to 15 pages

Learn More
Add To Cart

REVIEWS

tinabeezy
tinabeezy
5/5

I have a podcast and this is the first team that was able to provide what I needed to have a pretty and functional website. This was the best experience with a web designer/developer!! They were communicative, they were prompt, they were courteous, professional, and much more. I have two other businesses and will DEFINITELY use them again.

11 months ago
nrtbk2015
nrtbk2015
5/5

Despite a LOT of hiccups on my end, they pushed through and got exactly what I needed done. Very patient and great communication.

11 months ago
robcookkc
robcookkc
5/5

Great job!

1 year ago
timelessmedia
timelessmedia
5/5

They did a fabulous job, but it took longer than planned.

1 year ago
errolx1
errolx1
3/5

Working with Heavyside felt like that the design of the website is done by the customer and Heavyside will convert to WordPress and migrate to the internet

1 year ago

About Service

If you are looking to hire a web design company for your new website, there are some important questions you must ask first. There are three main elements involved when hiring a web design company, the first being what exactly you need your website to accomplish. The next is what type of experience does each of the companies you are investigating have, and the final question you must ask yourself is how much money will you be willing to spend on their services. By answering these three questions ahead of time, you can narrow down your search and make sure that the web design company you eventually choose will fit into your business plan.

Web design business. A web design company consists of four different departments: Design department deals with all the graphic designs and graphics on the websites. Web Development is responsible for all programming the website, both the coding and the style. Marketing Department handles any analysis that might be necessary, business goals, and content.

It is very important to hire a professional website designer or developer who has years of experience. A simple website does not mean a professional website. While most web design companies offer basic website design packages for purchase, they usually charge more for professional website design. Web development usually consists of building and maintaining a basic website with many features that can be customized. Web designers and developers are very creative and can create a very nice looking simple website that has all the features you are looking for.

There are many different tools that are available to help with designing your website. There are many different types of programs that allow you to set up a simple website, and there are many different tools that help you manage all of the information on your site. You can choose whether to have an online store, or if you want your customers to be able to order from your home page. This all depends on how much you want to customize your site, and what features you think will benefit your company the most.

Some of the top website designers and developers use flash, HTML, JavaScript, and many other tools that make it very easy for web designers and developers to get a very professional website up and running in very little time. There are many different features that you can add to a simple website. You can change the color scheme, change the fonts, change the borders, and many other features. Most web designers and developers use a lot of flash based features to make the web pages very interactive and appealing. You will find that there are many different things that you can do with the code that is built into your website.

Many website designers and developers use professional website designs and web development companies to get their sites looking exactly how they want. The professional web designers can create a website layout or design that will work exactly the way that you want it too. You should be sure that you hire a web development company that uses high quality web design principles.

Web Design Company Phoenix, Arizona

ABOUT Phoenix

The Hohokam people occupied the Phoenix area for 2,000 years. They created roughly 135 miles (217 kilometers) of irrigation canals, making the desert land arable, and paths of these canals were used for the Arizona Canal, Central Arizona Project Canal, and the Hayden-Rhodes Aqueduct. They also carried out extensive trade with the nearby Ancient Puebloans, Mogollon, and Sinagua, as well as with the more distant Mesoamerican civilizations. It is believed periods of drought and severe floods between 1300 and 1450 led to the Hohokam civilization's abandonment of the area.

After the departure of the Hohokam, groups of Akimel O'odham (commonly known as Pima), Tohono O'odham, and Maricopa tribes began to use the area, as well as segments of the Yavapai and Apache. The O'odham were offshoots of the Sobaipuri tribe, who in turn were thought to be the descendants of the Hohokam.

The Akimel O'odham were the major group in the area. They lived in small villages with well-defined irrigation systems that spread over the Gila River Valley, from Florence in the east to the Estrellas in the west. Their crops included corn, beans, and squash for food as well as cotton and tobacco. They banded with the Maricopa for protection against incursions by the Yuma and Apache tribes. The Maricopa are part of the larger Yuma people; however, they migrated east from the lower Colorado and Gila Rivers in the early 1800s, when they began to be enemies with other Yuma tribes, settling among the existing communities of the Akimel O'odham.

The Tohono O'odham also lived in the region, but largely to the south and all the way to the Mexican border. The O'odham lived in small settlements as seasonal farmers who took advantage of the rains, rather than the large-scale irrigation of the Akimel. They grew crops such as sweet corn, tapery beans, squash, lentils, sugar cane, and melons, as well as taking advantage of native plants such as saguaro fruits, cholla buds, mesquite tree beans, and mesquite candy (sap from the mesquite tree). They also hunted local game such as deer, rabbit, and javelina for meat.

The Mexican–American War ended in 1848, Mexico ceded its northern zone to the United States, and the region's residents became U.S. citizens. The Phoenix area became part of the New Mexico Territory. In 1863, the mining town of Wickenburg was the first to be established in Maricopa County, to the northwest of Phoenix. Maricopa County had not been incorporated; the land was within Yavapai County, which included the major town of Prescott to the north of Wickenburg.

The Army created Fort McDowell on the Verde River in 1865 to forestall Indian uprisings. The fort established a camp on the south side of the Salt River by 1866, which was the first settlement in the valley after the decline of the Hohokam. Other nearby settlements later merged to become the city of Tempe.

The history of Phoenix begins with Jack Swilling, a Confederate veteran of the Civil War who prospected in the nearby mining town of Wickenburg in the newly formed Arizona Territory. As he traveled through the Salt River Valley in 1867, he saw a potential for farming to supply Wickenburg with food. He also noted the eroded mounds of dirt that indicated previous canals dug by native peoples who had long since left the area. He formed the Swilling Irrigation and Canal Company that year, dug a large canal that drew in river water, and erected several crop fields in a location that is now within the eastern portion of central Phoenix near its airport. Other settlers soon began to arrive, appreciating the area's fertile soil and lack of frost, and the farmhouse Swilling constructed became a frequently-visited location in the valley.Lord Darrell Duppa was one of the original settlers in Swilling's party, and he suggested the name "Phoenix", as it described a city born from the ruins of a former civilization.

The Board of Supervisors in Yavapai County officially recognized the new town on May 4, 1868, and the first post office was established the following month with Swilling as the postmaster. In October 1870, valley residents met to select a new townsite for the valley's growing population. A new location three miles to the west of the original settlement, containing several allotments of farmland, was chosen, and lots began to officially be sold under the name of Phoenix in December of that year. This established the downtown core in a grid layout pattern that has been the hallmark of Phoenix's urban development ever since.

On February 12, 1871, the territorial legislature created Maricopa County by dividing Yavapai County; it was the sixth one formed in the Arizona Territory. The first election for county office was held in 1871 when Tom Barnum was elected the first sheriff. He ran unopposed when the other two candidates (John A. Chenowth and Jim Favorite) fought a duel; Chenowth killed Favorite and was forced to withdraw from the race.

The town grew during the 1870s, and President Ulysses S. Grant issued a land patent for the site of Phoenix on April 10, 1874. By 1875, the town had a telegraph office, 16 saloons, and four dance halls, but the townsite-commissioner form of government needed an overhaul. An election was held in 1875, and three village trustees and other officials were elected. By 1880, the town's population stood at 2,453.

By 1881, Phoenix's continued growth made the board of trustees obsolete. The Territorial Legislature passed the Phoenix Charter Bill, incorporating Phoenix and providing a mayor-council government; Governor John C. Fremont signed the bill on February 25, 1881, officially incorporating Phoenix as a city with a population of around 2,500.

The railroad's arrival in the valley in the 1880s was the first of several events that made Phoenix a trade center whose products reached eastern and western markets. In response, the Phoenix Chamber of Commerce was organized on November 4, 1888. The city offices moved into the new City Hall at Washington and Central in 1888. The territorial capital moved from Prescott to Phoenix in 1889, and the territorial offices were also in City Hall. The arrival of the Santa Fe, Prescott and Phoenix Railroad in 1895 connected Phoenix to Prescott, Flagstaff, and other communities in the northern part of the territory. The increased access to commerce expedited the city's economic rise. The Phoenix Union High School was established in 1895 with an enrollment of 90.

On February 25, 1901, Governor Oakes Murphy dedicated the permanent Capitol building, and the Carnegie Free Library opened seven years later, on February 18, 1908, dedicated by Benjamin Fowler. The National Reclamation Act was signed by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1902, which allowed dams to be built on waterways in the west for reclamation purposes. The first dam constructed under the act, Salt River Dam#1, began in 1903. It supplied both water and electricity, becoming the first multi-purpose dam, and Roosevelt attended the official dedication on May 18, 1911. At the time, it was the largest masonry dam in the world, forming a lake in the mountain east of Phoenix. The dam would be renamed after Teddy Roosevelt in 1917, and the lake would follow suit in 1959.

On February 14, 1912, Phoenix became a state capital, as Arizona was admitted to the Union as the 48th state under President William Howard Taft. This occurred just six months after Taft had vetoed a joint congressional resolution granting statehood to Arizona, due to his disapproval of the state constitution's position on the recall of judges. In 1913, Phoenix's move from a mayor-council system to council-manager made it one of the first cities in the United States with this form of city government. After statehood, Phoenix's growth started to accelerate; eight years later, its population reached 29,053. In 1920, Phoenix would see its first skyscraper, the Heard Building. In 1929, Sky Harbor was officially opened, at the time owned by Scenic Airways. The city purchased it in 1935 and continues to operate it today.

On March 4, 1930, former U.S. President Calvin Coolidge dedicated a dam on the Gila River named in his honor. However, the state had just been through a long drought, and the reservoir which was supposed to be behind the dam was virtually dry. The humorist Will Rogers, who was on hand as a guest speaker joked, "If that was my lake, I'd mow it." Phoenix's population had more than doubled during the 1920s, and now stood at 48,118. It was also during the 1930s that Phoenix and its surrounding area began to be called "The Valley of the Sun", which was an advertising slogan invented to boost tourism.

During World War II, Phoenix's economy shifted to that of a distribution center, transforming into an "embryonic industrial city" with the mass production of military supplies. There were three air force fields in the area: Luke Field, Williams Field, and Falcon Field, as well as two large pilot training camps, Thunderbird Field No. 1 in Glendale and Thunderbird Field No. 2 in Scottsdale.

A town that had just over 65,000 residents in 1940 became America's sixth largest city by 2010, with a population of nearly 1.5 million, and millions more in nearby suburbs. After the war, many of the men who had undergone their training in Arizona returned with their new families. Learning of this large untapped labor pool enticed many large industries to move their operations to the area. In 1948, high-tech industry, which would become a staple of the state's economy, arrived in Phoenix when Motorola chose Phoenix as the site of its new research and development center for military electronics. Seeing the same advantages as Motorola, other high-tech companies, such as Intel and McDonnell Douglas, moved into the valley and opened manufacturing operations.

By 1950, over 105,000 people resided in the city and thousands more in surrounding communities. The 1950s growth was spurred on by advances in air conditioning, which allowed homes and businesses to offset the extreme heat experienced in Phoenix and the surrounding areas during its long summers. There was more new construction in Phoenix in 1959 alone than from 1914 to 1946.

Like many emerging American cities at the time, Phoenix's spectacular growth did not occur evenly. It largely took place on the city's north side, a region that was nearly all Caucasian. In 1962, one local activist testified at a US Commission on Civil Rights of hearing that of 31,000 homes that had recently sprung up in this neighborhood, not a single one had been sold to an African-American. Phoenix's African-American and Mexican-American communities remained largely sequestered on the south side of town. The color lines were so rigid that no one north of Van Buren Street would rent to the African-American baseball star Willie Mays, in town for spring training in the 1960s. In 1964, a reporter from The New Republic wrote of segregation in these terms: "Apartheid is complete. The two cities look at each other across a golf course."

The continued rapid population growth led more businesses to the valley to take advantage of the labor pool, and manufacturing, particularly in the electronics sector, continued to grow. The convention and tourism industries saw rapid expansion during the 1960s, with tourism becoming the third largest industry by the end of the decade. In 1960, the Phoenix Corporate Center opened; at the time it was the tallest building in Arizona, topping off at 341 feet. The 1960s saw many other buildings constructed as the city expanded rapidly, including the Rosenzweig Center (1964), today called Phoenix City Square, the landmark Phoenix Financial Center (1964), as well as many of Phoenix's residential high-rises. In 1965 the Arizona Veterans Memorial Coliseum opened at the Arizona State Fairgrounds, west of downtown. When Phoenix was awarded an NBA franchise in 1968, which would be called the Phoenix Suns, they played their home games at the Coliseum until 1992, after which they moved to America West Arena. In 1968, President Lyndon B. Johnson approved the Central Arizona Project, assuring future water supplies for Phoenix, Tucson, and the agricultural corridor between them. The following year, Pope Paul VI created the Diocese of Phoenix on December 2, by splitting the Archdiocese of Tucson, with Edward A. McCarthy as the first Bishop.

In the 1970s the downtown area experienced a resurgence, with a level of construction activity not seen again until the urban real estate boom of the 2000s. By the end of the decade, Phoenix adopted the Phoenix Concept 2000 plan which split the city into urban villages, each with its own village core where greater height and density was permitted, further shaping the free-market development culture. The nine original villages have expanded to 15 over the years (see Cityscape below). This officially turned Phoenix into a city of many nodes, which would later be connected by freeways. The Phoenix Symphony Hall opened in 1972; other major structures which saw construction downtown during this decade were the First National Bank Plaza, the Valley Center (the tallest building in the state of Arizona), and the Arizona Bank building.

On September 25, 1981, Phoenix resident Sandra Day O'Connor broke the gender barrier on the U.S. Supreme Court, when she was sworn in as the first female justice. In 1985, the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, the nation's largest nuclear power plant, began electrical production.Pope John Paul II and Mother Teresa both visited the Valley in 1987.

There was an influx of refugees due to low-cost housing in the Sunnyslope area in the 1990s, resulting in 43 different languages being spoken in local schools by the year 2000. The new 20-story City Hall opened in 1992.

Phoenix has maintained a growth streak in recent years, growing by 24.2% before 2007. This made it the second-fastest-growing metropolitan area in the United States, surpassed only by Las Vegas. In 2008, Squaw Peak, the city's second tallest mountain, was renamed Piestewa Peak after Army Specialist Lori Ann Piestewa, an Arizonan and the first Native American woman to die in combat while serving in the U.S. military, as well as being the first American female casualty of the 2003 Iraq War. 2008 also saw Phoenix as one of the cities hardest hit by the subprime mortgage crisis, and by early 2009 the median home price was $150,000, down from its $262,000 peak in 2007. Crime rates in Phoenix have fallen in recent years, and once troubled, decaying neighborhoods such as South Mountain, Alhambra, and Maryvale have recovered and stabilized. Recently, downtown Phoenix and the central core have experienced renewed interest and growth, resulting in many restaurants, stores, and businesses opening or relocating to central Phoenix.

As of 2016, Phoenix is the 5th most populous city in the United States, with the census bureau estimating its population at 1,615,017, edging out Philadelphia with a population of 1,567,872. In the aftermath of the Great Recession, Phoenix had a population of 1,445,632 according to the 2010 United States Census, the sixth largest city and still the most populous state capital in the United States. Prior to the Great Recession, in 2006, Phoenix's population was 1,512,986, the fifth largest just ahead of Philadelphia.

After leading the U.S. in population growth for over a decade, the sub-prime mortgage crisis, followed by the recession, led to a slowing in the growth of Phoenix. There were approximately 77,000 people added to the population of the Phoenix metropolitan area in 2009, which was down significantly from its peak in 2006 of 162,000. Despite this slowing, Phoenix's population grew by 9.4% since the 2000 census (a total of 124,000 people), while the entire Phoenix metropolitan area grew by 28.9% during the same period. This compares with an overall growth rate nationally during the same time frame of 9.7%. Not since 1940–50, when the city had a population of 107,000, had the city gained less than 124,000 in a decade. Phoenix's recent growth rate of 9.4% from the 2010 census is the first time it has recorded a growth rate under 24% in a census decade. However, in 2016, Phoenix once again became the fastest growing city in the United States, adding approximately 88 people per day during the preceding year.

The Phoenix Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) (officially known as the Phoenix-Mesa-Chandler MSA ), is one of 10 MSAs in Arizona, and was the 11th largest in the United States, with a 2018 U.S. Census population estimate of 4,857,962, up from the 2010 Census population of 4,192,887. Consisting of both Pinal and Maricopa counties, the MSA accounts for 65.5% of Arizona's population. Phoenix only contributed 13% to the total growth rate of the MSA, down significantly from its 33% share during the prior decade. Phoenix is also part of the Arizona Sun Corridor megaregion (MR), which is the 10th most populous of the 11 MRs, and the 8th largest by area. It had the 2nd largest growth by percentage of the MRs (behind only the Gulf Coast MR) between 2000 and 2010.

The population is almost equally split between men and women, with men making up 50.2% of city's citizens. The population density is 2,797.8 people per square mile, and the city's median age is 32.2 years, with only 10.9 of the population being over 62. 98.5% of Phoenix's population lives in households with an average household size of 2.77 people.

There were 514,806 total households, with 64.2% of those households consisting of families: 42.3% married couples, 7% with an unmarried male as head of household, and 14.9% with an unmarried female as head of household. 33.6% of those households have children below the age of 18. Of the 35.8% of non-family households, 27.1% have a householder living alone, almost evenly split between men and women, with women having 13.7% and men occupying 13.5%.

Phoenix has 590,149 housing units, with an occupancy rate of 87.2%. The largest segment of vacancies is in the rental market, where the vacancy rate is 14.9%, and 51% of all vacancies are in rentals. Vacant houses for sale only make up 17.7% of the vacancies, with the rest being split among vacation properties and other various reasons.

The city's median household income was $47,866, and the median family income was $54,804. Males had a median income of $32,820 versus $27,466 for females. The city's per capita income was $24,110. 21.8% of the population and 17.1% of families were below the poverty line. Of the total population, 31.4% of those under the age of 18 and 10.5% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.

According to the 2010 Census, the racial breakdown of Phoenix was as follows:

Phoenix's population has historically been predominantly white. From 1890 to 1970, over 90% of the citizens were white. In recent years, this percentage has dropped, reaching 65% in 2010. However, a large part of this decrease can be attributed to new guidelines put out by the U.S. Census Bureau in 1980, when a question regarding Hispanic origin was added to the census questionnaire. This has led to an increasing tendency for some groups to no longer self-identify as white, and instead categorize themselves as "other races".

20.6% of the population of the city was foreign born in 2010. Of the 1,342,803 residents over 5 years of age, 63.5% spoke only English, 30.6% spoke Spanish at home, 2.5% spoke another Indo-European language, 2.1% spoke Asian or Islander languages, with the remaining 1.4% speaking other languages. About 15.7% of non-English speakers reported speaking English less than "very well". The largest national ancestries reported were Mexican (35.9%), German (15.3%), Irish (10.3%), English (9.4%), Black (6.5%), Italian (4.5%), French (2.7%), Polish (2.5%), American Indian (2.2%), and Scottish (2.0%).Hispanics or Latinos of any race make up 40.8% of the population. Of these the largest groups are at 35.9% Mexican, 0.6% Puerto Rican, 0.5% Guatemalan, 0.3% Salvadoran, 0.3% Cuban.

According to a 2014 study by the Pew Research Center, 66% of the population of the city identified themselves as Christians, while 26% claimed no religious affiliation. The same study says other religions (including Judaism, Buddhism, Islam, and Hinduism) collectively make up about 7% of the population. In 2010, according to the Association of Religion Data Archives, which conducts religious census each ten years, 39% of those polled in Maricopa county considered themselves a member of a religious group. Of those who expressed a religious affiliation, the area's religious composition was reported as 35% Catholic, 22% to Evangelical Protestant denominations, 16% Latter-Day Saints (LDS), 14% to nondenominational congregations, 7% to Mainline Protestant denominations, and 2% Hindu. The remaining 4% belong to other religions, such as Buddhism and Judaism.

While the number of religious adherents increased by 103,000 during the decade, the growth did not keep pace with the county's overall population increase of almost three-quarters of million individuals during the same period. The largest aggregate increases were in the LDS (a 58% increase) and Evangelical Protestant churches (14% increase), while all other categories saw their numbers drop slightly or remain static. The Catholic Church had an 8% drop, while mainline Protestant groups saw a 28% decline.

About Arizona

State in the United States of America is known as a state that is full of diversity. It has beautiful landscapes, beautiful people and abundant beauty within it. It has different ethnic groups and diverse culture.

Arizona's population has been increasing rapidly in recent years. This is attributed to an increase in number of visitors to this state. Arizona has one of the fastest growing populations of any state in United States of America and its population is expected to continue growing for the foreseeable future. Arizona has a very high fertility rate, which makes it very appealing for families.

Geology is one of the most important features of Arizona. It is a hotspot for geology, because it is located in the southwestern part of the United States. Geologists have made many theories on the cause of this but still cannot give any definite reason as to why this area is so popular for geology. There are numerous active fault lines in this region, which could explain this.

Population and Demography Arizona is a state with a large amount of population and a relatively small amount of demography. Arizona is composed of three main political counties; Pima, Maricopa and Phoenix. These counties contain a large amount of population and a large amount of demography. These two states together make up what is known as the Great Southwest. Within these states there are large cities that contain a large population of over a million people each.

There are twenty-six major cities in Arizona. These cities are known as the capital, the largest city, the third largest city, the second largest city, and the third largest county in the state. The capital is Phoenix, which is the largest city in Arizona. There are several major cities, which are located in other smaller cities, or along the I-40 freeway system.

Geology Arizona has the Grand Canyon as well as the world's second largest desert. This area is known for its history and for the geology. It is also popular for its hot springs and for hiking. Geologists and paleontologists have been researching the Grand Canyon for millions of years. They are still finding new information about it.

Culture Arizona is a state full of culture. There are several popular cultural festivals throughout the year. Music is especially popular here. Jazz, folk, blues, western, and classical music are all considered popular here.

Climate Arizona weather is very hot and humid in the summer months and cold and dry in the winter months. Arizona is a popular destination for outdoor activities, such as hunting, hiking, fishing, and golfing. It is a place with beautiful scenery and lots of wildlife. Wildlife such as deer, coyote, raccoons, eagles, as well as birds such as hummingbirds and numerous species of wildflowers can be seen in Arizona. There are also some deserts within the state, including the northern part, which is popular for desert camping, RVing, and hiking.

Homeownership There are a lot of homes for sale in Arizona. There are several different homebuyer markets. The hottest is in the Phoenix Metropolitan area, which has home values that have doubled. Homebuyers are getting more affordable home prices, which makes it easier to own a home. Also, there are plenty of vacation rentals that are available, making it a great vacation location.

Sports If you love sports, Arizona may be a great vacation spot for you. The Arizona State University Coyotes play at their home field at the University of Phoenix. Also, there are several other professional teams in the area. The Arizona Diamondbacks are an exciting team to watch, as they represent the South Division of the National League.

Golf Arizona is another popular vacation spot for many people. There are several golf courses in Arizona. The Flagstaff resort golf course is one of the most popular courses in Arizona. The course is also one of the oldest, so it offers a bit of historical value. As with any other sports, golfers are encouraged to exercise good judgment when playing and should always wear the proper attire.

Shopping One of the things that many people enjoy doing while on vacation is shopping. Arizona is also known for this activity. Tempe is home to a large mall that is popular for people shopping for clothing and electronics. There are also numerous independent malls in Arizona, making it easy to find the clothing or electronics that you want.